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Aneta Strachecka, Grzegorz Borsuk, Jerzy Paleolog, Krzysztof Olszewski, Milena Bajda and Jacek Chobotow

Abstract

Body-surface chemical compounds were studied in 1-day-old nest workers and foragers both in Buckfast and Caucasian bees. The workers of these two age-castes were sampled twice in each of two consecutive years. Body-surface lipids were determined by means of gas chromatography, with a GCQ mass spectrometer. Protein concentrations and activities on the body surface were examined in bee cuticle rinsings obtained from worker bees according to the methods of Lowry, of Anson, and of Lee and Lin. Protease and protease inhibitor activities were determined. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was performed. Caucasian bees, particularly foragers, had more lipids, but Buckfast bees (two age-castes) had more proteins on their body surfaces. A total of 17 alkane types (C17 - C33), 13 alkene types (C21 - C33), 21 esters (C12 - C32), and a phenol (C14) were detected in both races. Alkene C33 was detected only in Caucasian bees. More alkanes, esters, and phenols were found in Caucasian 1-day-old nest workers and foragers than in these age-castes of Buckfast bees. The protein concentration and protease inhibitor activities were lower in Caucasian bees that had higher protease activities. These values corresponded with specific numbers and widths of the electrophoretic bands.

Open access

Aneta Strachecka, Grzegorz Borsuk, Krzysztof Olszewski, Jerzy Paleolog, Mariusz Gagoś, Jacek Chobotow, Agnieszka Nawrocka, Magdalena Gryzińska and Milena Bajda

Abstract

Three groups of caged bees were fed with sugar syrup (the control), sugar syrup supplemented with amphotericin B (AmB) in a dose of 0.5 mg/ml, and sugar syrup with AmB in a dose of 0.25 mg/ ml. Amphotericin B shortened the life span of the bees and reduced the level of global DNA methylation compared to the control, however, it increased the body-surface protein concentrations. In the hindguts of the bees, there were found AmB deposits. Honeybees appear to be a useful model for studying the side effects of anti-fungal AmB therapy. Among other things, epigenetic changes and senescence acceleration are considered to be the side effects of the therapy.