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  • Author: J. O. Abiola x
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Open access

A. B. Ayinmode and J. O. Abiola

Abstract

The consumption of undercooked meat by humans is a potential infectious source for Toxoplasmosis. This study was aimed at finding potential infectious sources of Toxoplasma gondii for humans by investigating the seroprevalence of T. gondii in animals slaughtered in the Ibadan municipal abattoir. Serum samples from 1337 slaughtered animals (477 cattle, 267 sheep, 139 goats, and 454 pigs) were analyzed for the presence of antibodies to Toxoplasma gondii. Serological studies using the ELISA method demonstrated the prevalence of T. gondii antibodies in cattle, sheep, goats and pigs as 38.9%, 1.9%, 3.6% and 45.2%, respectively. Univariate statistical analysis detected an association between T. gondii seropositivity and sheep, goat and sex (P < 0.05). In the multivariate logistic regression model, only sheep, goats and pigs had an association with T. gondii seropositivity, while sex was a confounding factor. The detection of varying levels of antibodies to T. gondii infection in these food animals highlights their potential as a source of T. gondii for humans. Efforts should, therefore be directed at preventing the infection during the production and the processing of meat for food.

Open access

Alphonsus N. Onyiriuka, Abiola O. Oduwole, Elizabeth E. Oyenusi, Isaac O. Oluwayemi, Moustafa Kouyate, Olubunmi Fakaye, Chiedozie J. Achonwa and Mohammad Abdullahi

Abstract

We report a common diabetes management problem illustrated by an adolescent female university student with recurrent episodes of hypoglycaemia on Tuesdays when she has intensive academic activity lasting most of the day. Steps taken to reduce the risk of hypoglycaemia were patient education and empowerment, frequent self monitoring of blood glucose, reduction in insulin dose on Tuesdays and emphasizing availability of ongoing professional guidance and support anytime she may need it. One of the challenges encountered in the management of this patient was her family’s inability to afford the cost of basal-bolus regimen or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion via insulin pump; the two insulin regimens that best fit into university lifestyle. Conclusion: Adolescents with diabetes mellitus attending tertiary educational institutions may be at increased risk of hypoglycaemia, particularly on days when they have intensive academic activities.