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A. Chojecki and J. Mocek

Effect of Atmosphere in a Foundry Mould on Casting Surface Quality

Changes of gas pressure in the moulding sand in the zone adjacent to mould cavity were analysed during pouring of cast iron. No significant effect of pressure on the surface quality of castings was observed. In the second series of tests, the concentration of hydrogen in the gas atmosphere was measured. It has been found that the value of this concentration depends on metal composition and is particularly high in cast iron containing magnesium. This is due to the reduction of water vapour with the element that has high affinity to oxygen. The presence of hydrogen causes the formation of gas-induced defects on the casting surface.

Open access

J. Mocek and A. Chojecki

Abstract

A test mold was designed to investigate the full mold process. Pressure changes in a gap developing between the pattern made of foamed polystyrene and the raising column of liquid alloy were determined. Studies were conducted pouring molds with cast iron and with AK11 silumin. It was found that pressure is significantly higher in the case of cast iron, due to a higher rate of pattern decomposition and more advanced dissociation of hydrocarbons. The increase in pressure was observed to have no significant effect on changes in the pouring rate as it was compensated by higher metallostatic pressure. The increase of pressure occurs immediately after the start of pouring, it reaches a maximum and then stabilizes or decreases smoothly as a result of the drop in metallostatic pressure. The temperature of pouring has a significant effect on the decomposition rate of hydrocarbons evolving from the metal. During pouring of cast iron, the presence of hydrogen was revealed. It was particularly evident across the gas-permeable coating, where the concentration has exceeded 40%. Hydrogen precipitation was accompanied by an evolution on the casting surface of considerable amounts of pyrolytic carbon. It was found that gases forming in the gap were totally free from oxygen.

Open access

J. Mocek

Abstract

Drops of molten cast iron were placed on moulding sand substrates. The composition of the forming gaseous atmosphere was examined. It was found that as a result of the cast iron contact with water vapour released from the sand, a significant amount of hydrogen was evolved. In all the examined moulding sands, including sands without carbon, a large amount of CO was formed. The source of carbon monoxide was carbon present in cast iron. In the case of bentonite moulding sand with seacoal and sand bonded with furan resin, in the composition of the gases, the trace amounts of hydrocarbons, i.e. benzene, toluene, styrene and naphthalene (BTX), appeared. As the formed studies indicate much higher content of BTX at lower temperature it was concluded that the hydrocarbons are unstable in contact with molten iron.

Open access

J. Mocek and J. Zych

Abstract

The new investigation method of the kinetics of the gas emission from moulding sands used for moulds and cores is presented in this paper. The gas evolution rate is presented not only as a function of heating time but also as a function of instantaneous temperatures. In relation to the time and heating temperature the oxygen and hydrogen contents in evolving gases was also measured. This method was developed in the Laboratory of Foundry Moulds Technology, Faculty of Foundry Engineering, AGH. Gas amounts which are emitted from the moulding sand at the given temperature recalculated to the time unit (kinetics) are obtained in investigations. Results of investigations of moulding sand with furan resin are presented - as an example - in the paper.

Open access

N. Kaźnica, J. Zych and J. Mocek

Abstract

A large number of defects of castings made in sand moulds is caused by gases. There are several sources of gases: gases emitted from moulds, cores or protective coatings during pouring and casting solidification; water in moulding sands; moisture adsorbed from surroundings due to atmospheric conditions changes. In investigations of gas volumetric emissions of moulding sands amounts of gases emitted from moulding sand were determined - up to now - in dependence of the applied binders, sand grains, protective coatings or alloys used for moulds pouring. The results of investigating gas volumetric emissions of thin-walled sand cores poured with liquid metal are presented in the hereby paper. They correspond to the surface layer in the mould work part, which is decisive for the surface quality of the obtained castings. In addition, cores were stored under conditions of a high air humidity, where due to large differences in humidity, the moisture - from surroundings - was adsorbed into the surface layer of the sand mould. Due to that, it was possible to asses the influence of the adsorbed moisture on the gas volumetric emission from moulds and cores surface layers by means of the new method of investigating the gas emission kinetics from thin moulding sand layers heated by liquid metal. The results of investigations of kinetics of the gas emission from moulding sands with furan and alkyd resins as well as with hydrated sodium silicate (water glass) are presented. Kinetics of gases emissions from these kinds of moulding sands poured with Al-Si alloy were compared.

Open access

J. Zych and J. Mocek

Abstract

The obtained results of heating of sand moulds with binders by means of a thermal radiation of liquid metal are presented in this study. Standard samples for measuring Rg made of the tested moulding sands were suspended at the lower part of the cover which was covering the crucible with liquid metal (cast iron), placed in the induction furnace. The authors own methodology was applied in investigations. The progressing of the samples surface layers heating process was determined as the heating time function. Samples of a few kinds of moulding sands with chemical binders were tested. Samples without protective coatings as well as samples with such coatings were tested. The influence of the thermal radiation on bending resistance of samples after their cooling was estimated. The influence of several parameters such as: time of heating, distance from the metal surface, metal temperature, application of coatings, were tested. A very fast loss of strength of moulding sands with organic binders was found, especially in cases when the distance between metal and sample surfaces was small and equaled to 10÷15 mm. Then, already after app. 15 seconds of the radiation (at Tmet=1400°C), the resistance decreases by nearly 70%. Generally, moulding sands with organic binders are losing their strength very fast, while moulding sands with water glass at first increase their strength and later slightly lose. The deposition of protective coatings increases the strength of the mould surface layers, however does not allow to retain this strength after the metal thermal radiation.

Open access

J. Zych, J. Mocek, T. Snopkiewicz and Ł. Jamrozowicz

Abstract

The investigation results of the thermal conductivity of the selected group of moulding sands with chemical binders, mainly organic, are presented in the hereby paper. Studies encompassed also moulding sands into which additions improving the thermal conductivity were introduced. Two testing methods were applied, i.e. investigations at a steady and unsteady temperature zone. For investigations at a steady temperature zone the new original experimental stand was designed and built, adapted also for testing moulding sands with binders undergoing destruction at relatively low temperatures.

Open access

M. Holtzer, A. Bobrowski, D. Drożyński and J. Mocek

Abstract

High-manganese cast steels are characterised by a high abrasion resistance under friction conditions with a simultaneous influence of pressure and impacts. This cast steel is especially suitable for castings of excavator’s scoops, track links, streetcars crossovers, parts of crushers and mills for braking up of hard materials [1-4]. In order to obtain high quality castings of high-manganese cast steels in moulds on the high-silica sand matrices it is necessary to apply protective coatings, which prevent a direct contact between metal and matrix (SiO2). Manganese after being poured into a mould can undergo a partial oxidation forming MnO, which reacts with silica. As a result low-melting manganese silicates are formed, which in a form of a tight layer adhere to the casting surface, significantly increasing a labour input related to cleaning. Three kinds of protective coatings were tested: zirconium, corundum and magnesite. As a base moulding sands on high-silica sand matrices with three kinds of resol resins were applied. The quality of the obtained casting surface was assessed in dependence of the protective coating and resin kind and also in dependence of the metallostatic pressure value.

Open access

J. Mocek and A. Chojecki

Abstract

In sand moulds, at a distance of 3 mm from the metal- mould interface, the sensors of temperature, and of oxygen and hydrogen content were installed. Temperature and the evolution of partial gas pressure have been analysed in moulds bonded with bentonite with or without the addition of seacoal, water glass or furan resin. Moulds were poured with ductile iron. For comparison, also tests with the grey iron have been executed. It was found that the gas atmosphere near the interface depends mainly on the content of a carbonaceous substance in the mould. In the green sand moulds with 5% of seacoal or bonded with furan resin, after the mould filling, a sudden increase in the hydrogen content and the drop of oxygen is observed. This gas evolution results from the oxidation of carbon and reduction of water vapour in the mould material, and also from the reduction of water vapour and alloy reoxidation. In carbon-free sand, the evolution in the gas composition is slower because water vapour is reduced only at the interface. Changes of oxygen and hydrogen content in the controlled zone are determined by the transport phenomena.

Open access

A. Kmita, D. Drożyński, J. Mocek, A. Roczniak, J. Zych and M. Holtzer

Abstract

The results concerning emission of gases from two commercial graphite protective coatings for moulds and cores (water and alcoholic) are given in the hereby paper. Investigations were performed in two systems. One of the systems was corresponding to conditions occurring inside the mould cavity immediately after its pouring with liquid metal (Method 1), while the second was simulating conditions deep inside the mould at a certain distance from the casting (Method 2). Investigations were carried out in the CO2 atmosphere and in the air. The water protective coating generated 1.5 to 3 times larger volume of gases than the alcoholic coating (in dependence on the measuring method and atmosphere). The smallest differences occurred in the air atmosphere, while the largest in the CO2 atmosphere.