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  • Author: J. Hu x
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Somatic cell count of milk from different goat breeds

Abstract

There is no standard limit value for somatic cell count (SCC) of raw goat milk in the EU despite that excellent hygienic quality milk is needed for the manufacture of fermented milk products or cheese varieties. Mastitis often results such high SCC - besides the potential risk for humans - that the clotting of milk will not be perfect, resulting slack curd with higher whey releasing; furthermore, wrong structure, ripening, bad sensory properties of cheese can also be its consequences. In this paper, we report the SCC of milk samples from five different goat breeds bred in Hungary, measured with two fast methods compared with the results from the reference method. Furthermore, we investigated the applicability and the accuracy of the MT-02 (Agro Legato Ltd., Hungary) instrument. We determined that the White Side test and the instrument MT were suitable for the estimation of possible risks and consequences in the case of the use of high SCC milk before production. The general summarized average milk SCC was 6.64 × 105 ml−1. The highest difference between the results from MT-02 and the fluorometric (reference) method was 5 × 105 ml−1, but it was a singular, extreme value. The r2 of the calculated linear calibration equation was 0.7819; consequently, this method seems to be applicable in the measurement of SCC with MT-02 instrument. Furthermore, the SCC of samples did not differ significantly by genotypes and by seasons (spring: 5.85 × 105 ml−1, autumn: 6.22 × 105 ml−1).

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The first detailed ornithological description of the island of Žirje (Croatia)

Abstract

Ornithofauna of the island of Žirje has not been explored yet. During an early and late survey in September of 2013 and 2014 altogether 50 bird species were recorded, 34 and 41 species was noted including both migratory and resident species in the two parts of the month, respectively. Nine species appeared only at the first half, while 16 species were registered only at the second half of the mouth. The results of this preliminary survey showed the obvious need for more intensive research of the island’s bird fauna, with special attention on nesting and wintering birds.

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The epidemiology of swine trichinellosis in China during 1999–2004

Abstract

The epidemiology of swine trichinellosis in China during 1999–2004 was reported in this paper. The seroepidemiological survey of swine trichinellosis was carried out by ELISA in 4 Provinces or Autonomous Regions (P/A), the seroprevalence was from 1.63 % to 15.21 %. The prevalence of Trichinella infection in swine slaughtered at abattoirs varied from 0.0001 % to 23 % in 7 P/A. Both of the seroprevalence and prevalence of swine trichinellosis in China has obviously decreased compared with that in 1990’s. The decrease was probably due to a combination of factors, including development of industrialized pig farms, application of commercial grain forages, the improvement of pig production practices and the shortening of swine feeding time. At present, swine trichinellosis in China still is mainly transmitted by garbage (ie. feeding pigs with raw swill). Trichinella infected pigs are predominately from the small farms of suburbs where pigs are fed on swill from the restaurants and from some mountainous areas where pigs are raised outdoors. Pigs were sometimes slaughtered clandestinely at home in rural and mountainous areas without veterinary inspection. The prevalence of Trichinella infection in pork sold at the market was from 0.52 % to 3.66 % in 3 P/A. 17 outbreaks of human trichinellosis, with 828 cases and 11 deaths, were recorded in 8 P/M of China during 2000–2004. Out of 17 outbreaks, 13 (76.47 %) outbreaks were caused by eating raw or poorly cooked pork. Hence, the pig-rearing mode should be changed and all pigs should be raised in piggery, and the mandatory inspection of meat be further strengthen for the control of trichinellosis.

Open access
Cigarette Mouth Insertion Depths Among Chinese Smokers

Abstract

Vent blocking - where filter ventilation holes are intentionally or unintentionally, partly or completely covered by smokers’ lips during smoking - is an aspect of smoking behavior which can alter mainstream smoke yields. This study was designed to determine if, and to what extent ventilation holes were blocked by smokers’ lips in two cohorts of Chinese smokers. In this study, two groups of samples were collected. One group (1742 butts) was collected randomly from public places in six chosen cities. Another (1037 butts) was obtained by collecting the butts from identified smokers in Kunming. In this paper, the mouth insertion depth among Chinese smokers was studied for the first time by a staining method employing ninhydrin in ethanol. The results indicate that Chinese smokers exhibit a mouth insertion depth ranging from 1 to 17 mm with an average value of 7.5 AA± 2 mm. In this study, 95% of the ventilated filters examined showed that the vent zone was neither completely nor partially covered by smokers’ lips.

Open access
Transfer Logic Gates With Electrical And Optical Inputs For Large Area Electronics

Abstract

A new type of transfer logic gates with both electrical and/or optical inputs and electrical outputs are proposed, which can be prepared by thin film technology. The possible realization of different logic functions and non-volatile memory logic arrays are demonstrated. The possible application fields are briefly discussed.

Open access
Experiences of using the fruit waste of the modern Hungarian pálinka fermentation technology for the foraging of extensively kept grey cattle

Abstract

In this article, the authors report on the experiences of six years of foraging, describing how the fruit wastes generated in the Pannonhalmi Pálinkárium are utilized for foraging Hungarian grey cattle. The goal is not the control or improvement of the cattle’s growth indices but the problem-free, continuous and eco-friendly disposal of the fruit waste. They have found that the fruit waste or pomace is virtually nothing else than protein-enriched sugar-free fruit, and that during the utilization of this they have to maximally adapt to the cattle’s life-cycle, biological nature and environmental factors, and they will repay you by eating the pomace. They conclude that the grey cattle are a skin-and-hairs-covered bioreactor, which provides an economical service for the distillery through the utilization of the fruit waste. Nowadays, 150,000-200,000 tons of fruit waste is produced every year, and only a few percent of this is utilized in ruminant forage. By writing this article, the authors would like to expand our very scarce knowledge on this topic.

Open access
The role of selenium in nutrition – A review

Abstract

The role of selenium has been changed over the last decade. The element that was previously considered to be toxic turned out to be present in the human body in amounts of 10–15 mg, and almost every cell of our body contains it. Selenium contributes to growth, supports healthy muscle activity, reproductive organs, reduces the toxicity of certain elements such as mercury, supports the immune system, and even delays the spread of certain viruses (influenza, Ebola, HIV). Selenium-deficient areas of Europe could be a risk for their populations. The recommended daily intake (RDA) of selenium is 55 µg/day, while WHO and FAO have set up the daily tolerable dose at 400 µg/day. We must count with the harmful effects of selenium overdose, but it is almost impossible to introduce this amount into our body solely with food. Our selenium sources can be refilled with food supplements or selenium-enriched functional foods. In the review article, we report about the role of selenium in the environment, selenium-enriched plants, selenium-enriched yeast, the role of selenium in animal feed and in the human body, the opportunities of selenium restoration, selenium-enriched animal products, and the selenium content of milk.

Open access
The role of vitamins in the diet of the elderly I. Fat-soluble vitamins

Abstract

Following a discussion on the daily energy and protein requirements of elderly people, the authors will go on to talk about vitamin needs and the role of the four fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K). They point out that vitamin requirements in old age do not essentially differ from adult people’s, but they must take account of the fact that the body’s vitamin stores might get filled up, which may reduce vitamin needs, on the one part, but the altered physiological processes may increase them, on the other. Regarding the case of fat-soluble vitamins, reduced fat absorption, decreased vitamin storage capacity of the liver, reduced dietary intake, partial deficiency of digestive enzymes, and absorption disorders in the intestines may all lead to vitamin deficiencies. Problems may also arise due to multiple vitamin overdose developed either as a consequence of overconsumption of vitamin tablets or because the body’s vitamin stores are constantly filled up to maximum capacity. Positive and negative changes resulting from the consumption of several times the daily dose recommendations are covered as well. The authors show that A, D, E, or K vitamin deficiency occurs very rarely in the case of a normal diet; however, great care must be taken in order to meet vitamin D and, simultaneously, calcium requirements so that to avoid osteoporosis and an increased risk of bone fractures in elderly people. The paper discusses the fat-soluble vitamin needs of the elderly and, where necessary, specifies the requirements for men and women separately, while also touching upon those foodstuffs and methods that can contribute to the optimal satisfaction of the elderly people’s vitamin needs.

Open access
The role of vitamins in the diet of the elderly II. Water-soluble vitamins

Abstract

Following a presentation of humans’ water-soluble vitamin requirements, the authors will discuss in detail the role these vitamins play in human organism and outline those major biochemical processes that are negatively affected in the body in case of vitamin deficiency. They point out that in the elderly population of developed countries cases of water-soluble vitamin deficiency are extremely rare and they are due to the lack of dietary vitamin, but mostly to the vitamin being released from its bindings, the difficulty of free vitamin absorption, gastrointestinal problems, medication, and often alcoholism. Among water-soluble vitamins, B12 is the only one with a sufficient storage level in the body, capable of preventing deficiency symptoms for a long period of time in cases of vitamin-deficient nutrition. Each type of vitamin is dealt with separately in discussing the beneficial outcomes of their overconsumption regarding health, while the authors of the article also present cases with contradictory results. Daily requirements are set forth for every water-soluble vitamin and information is provided on the types of nutrients that help us to the water-soluble vitamins essential for the organism.

Open access