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  • Author: Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski x
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Open access

Jan Olechnowicz and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

The objective of this study was to present a relationship between mastitis in the post-calving period and fertility traits of dairy cows. The threshold of 200,000 cells/ml for somatic cell count is used as a reference for healthy quarters of the cow’s udder. The genetic correlation between mastitis and somatic cell count is strong (from 0.7 to 0.8). Although heritability for fertility traits is low (from 0.01 to 0.02), the genetic standard deviation for mastitis varies from 1.2 to 7.0 percentage units, suggesting that genetic gain can be achieved by selecting for mastitis. Results of this study suggest that mastitis in the postpartum period can have a markedly negative impact on the reproductive performance of dairy cows. The synergistic effect of common conditions (somatic cell count, body condition score and lameness score) or other factors (e.g. heat stress, fertility management, the presence of repeat breeders) also lowers fertility of cows. Production of milk with fewer than 100,000 cells/ml leads to improved health and fertility in the cows.

Open access

Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski, Marek Gehrke, Magdalena Herudzińska, Bartłomiej M. Jaśkowski and Klaus-Peter Brüssow

Abstract

Oestrus resynchronisation (RES, Resynch) programmes for non-pregnant cows allow shortening the period between an unsuccessful insemination and the next attempt on the same cow. The protocol of oestrus RES may be started after ruling out pregnancy by means of ultrasonography carried out 28 days after insemination or after performing a test for pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PAG) in blood or milk. The Resynch protocol can be based on a double application of prostaglandins, the OvSynch protocol, or hormonal therapy with exogenous sources of progesterone (CIDR intravaginal devices). The efficiency of the method depends on the functional state of the ovaries, the diameter of the corpus luteum, external factors, and the health and maturity of the cows. The present paper constitutes a comparison of research findings concerning the effectiveness of RES programmes.

Open access

Agata Józefiak, Mariusz Woźniak and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) is a viral disease of the respiratory system caused by coronaviruses (CoV), which can be contagious to both animals and humans. It was first described in 2012 in Saudi Arabia and very quickly its occurrence was found in European countries. Initially, it was associated with mild changes within the respiratory system, until a new type of virus was isolated in a patient with severe pneumonia and renal failure, who died. The study showed a close relationship between the virus isolated from the patient’s cells with HKU4 and HKU5 coronaviruses, previously isolated from bats. The presence of the same virus was found in a patient from Qatar with a similar clinical image. MERS infections, despite relatively low infectivity, are characterized by high mortality (30%). It is believed that the most likely source of the virus for humans are camels. The objective of this article is to review and discuss data on the risk factors of MERS-CoV zoonotic transmission from animals to humans.

Open access

Marta Rybska, Sandra Knap, Maurycy Jankowski, Michal Jeseta, Dorota Bukowska, Paweł Antosik, Michał Nowicki, Maciej Zabel, Bartosz Kempisty and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

The pig is a polyestrous animal in which the ovarian cycle lasts about 21 days and results in ovulation of 10-25 oocytes. Ovum reaches 120-150 μm in diameter, with the surrounding corona radiata providing communication with the environment. The zona pellucida is composed of glycoproteins: ZP1, ZP2, ZP3. In the course of oogenesis, RNA and protein accumulation for embryonic development occurs. Maternal mRNA is the template for protein production. Nuclear, cytoplasmic and genomic maturity condition the ability of the ovum to undergo fertilization. There are several differences in protein expression profiles observed between in vitro and in vivo conditions. Oogenesis is the process of differentiating female primary sex cells into gametes. During development gonocytes migrate from the yolk sac into the primary gonads with TGF-1, fibronectin, and laminin regulating this process. Cell cycle is blocked in dictyotene. Primary oocyte maturation is resumed before each ovulation and lasts until the next block in metaphase II. At the moment of penetration of the sperm into the ovum, the metaphase block is broken. The oocytes, surrounded by a single layer of granular cells, form the ovarian follicle. The exchange of signals between the oocyte and the cumulus cells done by gap-junctions, as well as various endo and paracrine signals. The contact between the corona radiata cells provides substances necessary for growth, through the same gap junctions. Studies on follicular cells can be used to amplify the knowledge of gene expression in these cells, in order to open way for potential clinical applications.

Open access

Marta Rybska, Sandra Knap, Katarzyna Stefańska, Maurycy Jankowski, Agata Chamier-Gliszczyńska, Małgorzata Popis, Michal Jeseta, Dorota Bukowska, Paweł Antosik, Bartosz Kempisty and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

The superfamily of transforming growth factors β (TGF-β) consists of cytokines that are crucial in regulating the organism’s biological functions and includes three isoforms of TGF-β protein, Anti-Müllerian Hormone (AMH), inhibin A and B, activins, 20 bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP1-20) and 9 growth factors (GDF1-9). Their signal transduction pathway involves three types of membrane receptors that exhibit a serine/threonine kinase activity, as well as the Smad proteins. After ligand binding, the Smad proteins are phosphorylated and translocated to the nucleus, where they interact with transcription factors and affect gene expression. TGF-β family members are involved in cell growth and differentiation, as well as chemo-taxis and apoptosis, and play an important role during an inflammation. Defects in TGF-β proteins or in their signalling pathway underlie many severe diseases, such as systemic lupus, systemic scleroderma, bronchial asthma, atherosclerosis, hyperthyroidism or cancer. These factors are also crucial in mammal reproductive functions, as they are involved in folliculogenesis, steroidogenesis, ovulation, maternal-embryo interaction, embryo development and uterine decidualization. Their defects result in issues with fertility. This review focuses on the relevance of TGF-β family members in a mammal reproduction with an emphasis on three TGF-β isoforms, inhibins A and B, GDF-9 and their signal transduction pathway.

Open access

Marta Rybska, Sandra Knap, Maurycy Jankowski, Michal Jeseta, Dorota Bukowska, Paweł Antosik, Michał Nowicki, Maciej Zabel, Bartosz Kempisty and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

Folliculogenesis is the process of ovarian follicle formation,, taking presence during foetal period. During the follicular development, oogoniums undergo meiosis and oocytes are formed. In the ovaries of new born sows, primary and secondary follicles are present and, 90 days after birth, tertiary follicles appear. During development in the ovarian follicles growth of granulosa cells and differentiation of the thecal cells can be observed. A cavity filled with follicular fluid appears. Granulosa cells are divided into: mural cells and corona radiata, which together with the oocyte form the cumulus oophorus. Corona radiata cells, mural layers and oolemma contact each other by a network of gap junctions. Secreted from the pituitary gland, FSH and LH gonadotropin hormones act on receptors located in granular and follicular cells. In the postnatal life tertiary follicles and Graafian follicles are formed. When the follicle reaches a diameter of 1 mm, further growth depends on the secretion of gonadotropins. Mature ovarian follicles produce: progestins, androgens and oestrogens. The growth, differentiation and steroidogenic activity of ovarian follicles, in addition to FSH and LH, is also affected by prolactin, oxytocin, steroid and protein hormones, numerous proteins from the cytokine and interleukin family, metabolic hormones like insulin, glucocorticoids, leptin, thyroid hormones and growth hormones. Despite numerous studies, many processes related to folliculogenesis have not been discovered Learning the mechanisms regulating reproductive processes would allow to easily distinguish pathological processes and discover more and more genes and mechanisms of their expression in cells that build ovarian follicles.

Open access

Marta Rybska, Sandra Knap, Maurycy Jankowski, Blanka Borowiec, Michal Jeseta, Dorota Bukowska, Paweł Antosik, Michał Nowicki, Maciej Zabel, Bartosz Kempisty and Jędrzej M. Jaśkowski

Abstract

Ovarian cysts remain to be one of the most common and serious problems in reproduction of farm animals, as well as humans. Apart from causing the fall in reproductive potential of the ovaries, occupying the place in which folliculogenesis and oogenesis occur, they also cause hormone imbalances, by preventing corpus luteum formation, hence lowering the amount of steroid hormone production. While singular cysts rarely affect fertility, hormone fluctuations that are associated with their presence promotes their multiplication, which usually has more adverse effects. While the cysts are easily detectable in humans, possessing distinct echography while examined by ultrasound, multiple factors prevent widespread use of effective detection methods among large herds of farm animals. Because of lack of noticeable symptoms of early stages of such malignancies, they rarely get detected before the animal stops to exhibit symptoms of heat. That causes scientific research to be focused on not only methods of detection, but also the ways to negate the effects of ovarian cysts and bring the affected specimen back to reproductive potential. Despite that, high costs of diagnosis and treatment, cause them to be uncommon on commercial farms. As lack of fertility eliminates animals from breeding purposed herds, ovarian cysts persist as a cause of large losses of the animal husbandry business. Continuous research, focused on natural examples of ovarian cysts should be conducted, in order to improve methods of detection, prevention, treatment and recovery from the effects of ovarian cysts.