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Stanislav Miltner, Ivo Kupka and Michal Třeštík

Abstract

Northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.) is one of the most important introduced tree species in the Czech Republic, occupying about 6,000 ha with ca. 900,000 m3 of the standing volume. The presented study aims to evaluate its soil forming effects on natural oak sites. Soil chemistry of the upper soil layers (F+H, Ah, B horizons) was studied in three pairs of stands of both species. In each stand, four bulk samples were taken separately for particular horizons, each consisting of 5 soil-borer cores. The soil characteristics analysed were: pH (active and potential), soil adsorption complex characteristics (content of bases, exchangeable cation capacity, base saturation), exchangeable acidity (exchangeable Al and H), total carbon and nitrogen content, and plant available nutrients content (P, K, Ca, Mg). Total macronutrient content (P, K, Ca, Mg) was analysed only in holorganic horizons. Results confirmed acidification effects of red oak on the upper forest soil layers such as decreased pH, base content, base saturation, all nutrient contents in total as well as plant-available form and increased soil exchangeable acidity (exchangeable Al) in comparison to the sessile oak stands, especially in holorganic horizons and in the uppermost mineral layer (Ah horizon). Northern red oak can be considered as a slightly site-soil degrading species in the studied sites and environmental conditions in comparison to native oak species.

Open access

Petr Zahradník, Josef Frýdl, Vít Šrámek, Bohumír Lomský, František Havránek, Marian Slodičák, Antonín Jurásek, František Šach, Vladimír Černohous, Jindřich Neruda, Jiří Matějíček and Ivo Kupka

Abstract

The Forestry and Game Management Research Institute (Czechia) was founded on 31st October 1921 with the establishment of the Forest Protection Department. In the era before and after the World War II, several more institutes were founded, and they underwent a number of reorganizations during the 1950s and finally took the form more or less corresponding with the current one. The institute went through further major changes in the early 1990s. In the 1950s, the forestry research saw dynamic development, partially also caused by a significant increase in the number of experts and finalization of the original concept of the institutional structure which covered almost all fields of forestry. Research focused on topical issues of the forest management, covering forest protection, silviculture, forest ecology, biology ad breeding of forest trees, seed growing, forest economy, forestry mechanization, forest management planning and game management. Results were provided to the forestry practice, and there also were numerous monographs and both scientific and expert articles which helped disseminate new findings. Many of these findings have been applied up to now and others built the basis for further research that has been followed on by the current generation of researchers.