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Lean Information Management: Criteria For Selecting Key Performance Indicators At Shop Floor

Abstract

Most successful organizations worldwide use key performance indicators as an important part of their corporate strategy in order to forecast, measure and plan their businesses. Performance metrics vary in their purpose, definition and content. Therefore, the way organizations select what they think are the optimal indicators for their businesses varies from company to company, sometimes even from department to department. This study aims to answer the question of what is the most suitable way to define and select key performance indicators. More than that, it identifies the right criteria to select key performance indicators at shop floor level. This paper contributes to prior research by analysing and comparing previously researched selection criteria and proposes an original six-criteria-model, which caters towards choosing the most adequate KPIs. Furthermore, the authors take the research a step further by further steps to closed research gaps within this field of study.

Open access
Succesful Lean Manufacturing Implementation: Internal Key Influencing Factors

Abstract

Manufacturing sectors and companies all over the world are successfully implementing lean principles within their processes. Nowadays, lean has become an indispensable part of global players. Companies worldwide need to be aware of multiple factors which weigh heavily on the success or failure of lean implementation. This paper focuses on giving a brief and structured overview over the fundamental organizational factors which play a substantial role for the lean manufacturing (LM) implementation process. The study below focuses on internal factors which are indispensable for a successful LM implementation within organizations. It is imperative that these internal factors are known, recognized and taken into consideration during the whole LM implementation process. Ignoring their influence on the process's implementation may lead to endangering the expected results or to making the process more difficult which could result in much higher human resource consumption.

Open access
Odel of Dynamic Integration of Lean Shop Floor Management Within the Organizational Management System

Abstract

The key to achieve a sustainable development lies in the customer satisfaction through improved quality, reduced cost, reduced delivery lead times and proper communication. The objective of the lean manufacturing system (LMS) is to identify and eliminate the processes and resources which do not add value to a product. The following paper aims to present a proposal of further development of integrated management systems in organizations through the implementation of lean shop floor management. In the first part of the paper, a dynamic model of the implementation steps will be presented. Furthermore, the paper underlines the importance of implementing a lean culture parallel with each step of integrating the lean methods and tools. The paper also describes the Toyota philosophy, tools, and the supporting lean culture necessary to implementing an efficient lean system in productive organizations

Open access
Human Resources As Risk Factors For Lean Manufacturing Implementation

Abstract

The purpose of lean managements is to create and determine value and eliminate all non-value added activities. The idea of lean in the current manufacturing environment is to work and produce from the customer's perspective, and therefore to define value as a variable directly depending on the consumer of the good or service. Basically, lean is concerned with creating more value with fewer resources. LM (lean manufacturing) allows organizations to prosper in the marketplace being able to price competitively or invest in the development of products for future sustainability. Reducing the amount of waste, in example defective products, increases profits resulting in greater overall efficiencies. This paper analyses the risk factors which can hinder having a successful LM within an organization. The core focus of this study lies in discussing the risk factors in regards to human resources which can hinder organizations to successfully implement LM. Through a thorough literature and study review, the paper underlines the importance of a lean organizational culture and management. The lack of alignment of these two areas with the LM implementation will result in turning them from being the strongest implementation KPIs into being the highest risk factors and barriers for the company.

Open access