Search Results

1 - 4 of 4 items

  • Author: István Berszán x
Clear All Modify Search

Abstract

In his article “Practical Rhythm and Time Projection”, István Berszán presents first a poetic experiment of Wordsworth in order to answer the question how to enter the rhythm of a happening. The argumentation is based on the assumption that Plato’s “allegory” of the cave is an experiment rather than a rhetorical construction and invokes contemporary string theory to show that everything that happens has its kinetic space as a special complementary rhythmic dimension. A second example reveals how Alain Badiou projects Saint Paul’s teaching and practice to the kinetic space of militant leftist struggle. The article concludes that instead of understanding allegory as a replacement based on similarity in the same rhetoric space, we have to take into consideration – or learn how to take into consideration – the multiple rhythmic dimensions of compared happenings.

Abstract

In our academic environment, borders are usually treated within the territorial-institutional demarcation or the political resistance against such actions. In his essay “What is a Border?” Étienne Balibar focuses on political examples. What kind of demarcation is at work here? What kind of boundaries integrate everything in the space of social historical relations as if there was nothing else outside us? Politically speaking, we have created the institution of border, but according to the Australian philosopher Jeff Malpas, our being-in-the-world implies all-encompassing places as the material condition for the appearance of things and living creatures. The Hungarian term “határ” (border) has a specific meaning referring to the natural environment of a settlement: not a concrete line, but a field with depth around the built habitat of people. Can we apply a border theory based on political issues to our neighbourhood with non-human creatures? To what extent will the concept of border be changed if we consider different spaces of contact making? Through the close reading of some fragments from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden and Jack London’s White Fang, my paper shows how literature and the arts help us ask and investigate such questions.

OPEN ACCESS

Abstract

In the first part of the Introduction Levente T. Szabó introduces Hungarian Studies Yearbook revealing its purpose to serve as a new scholarly hub and focal point for Hungarian studies oriented both towards methodologically challenging experiences and an evidence-based, resource-oriented Hungarian studies. In the second part of the introduction István Berszán presents the thematic issue “Kinetic Spaces – the Challenge of Complexity by Practical Rhythms”, which initiates interdisciplinary research into the rhythm of practices and occurrences in order to open fields of orientation that are larger than recent paradigmatic spaces.

Abstract

In their article “Hand-Written Road Maps to Multi-Dimensional Space” István Berszán and Philip Gross investigate the heightened alertness of literary reading and writing in an interview with Gross, the prize-winning British poet and professor of creative writing. After the presentation of the interviewee Berszán ask him questions concerning the kinetic spaces of his literary practices. The itinerary follows issues like place, temporality of occurrences, attention, system and ecology, metaphor, time projection, gesture-resonance and collaboration. Gross seems to be as good a creative playmate during the discussion as he was for children, students, artists or readers who met him in a „collaborative space between”: his answers turn the questions both into hunter and quarry.