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  • Author: Irena I. Gencheva x
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Open access

Irena I. Gencheva and Adelaida L. Ruseva

Summary

The enzymatic method for the determination of serum creatinine is accepted as one of the most accurate methods in a clinical laboratory. This method was used on a biochemistry auto analyzer (Cobas Integra 400) to determine serum creatinine at the laboratory of University Hospital – Pleven. The characteristics and reliability of this enzymatic method for creatinine were compared with the Jaffe kinetic method. Effects of some interfering substances like bilirubin and glucose on the Jaffe kinetic method and the enzymatic method were compared. Glucose and bilirubin inhibit the reaction between creatinine and alkaline picrate. Glucose slowly reduces picric acid to picrate, while the bilirubin present in a sample is oxidized to biliverdin under alkaline conditions. This leads to a decrease in absorbance at 520 nm. We measured creatinine in serum samples with the enzymatic method and the Jaffe kinetic method in samples divided into four groups: group I –samples without bilirubin and glucose ; group II –samples with high level of glucose; group III - samples with high level of bilirubin, group IV – all samples. For Group I, the correlation coefficient obtained by comparing the enzymatic creatinine method and Jaffe's kinetic method was R = 0.983. There was a very good agreement between the two methods in terms of correlation coefficient even in the samples with high levels of glucose or bilirubin.

Open access

Irena I. Gencheva-Angelova, Adelaida L. Ruseva and Juli I.Pastuhov

Summary

Significant losses of functional proteins such as hormones and hormone-binding proteins are seen in patients suffering from proteinuria. Studies have reported loss of thyroid hormones and thyroxine-binding globulin in the urine. There is evidence that subclinical hypothyroidism is six times more common in patients with proteinuria than in healthy people. The parameters of the effect of proteinuria on thyroid function have not been fully studiedyet.We investigated 74 patients with qualitatively established proteinuria, of whom 34 men and 40 women, without diagnosed thyroid disease. The average age of the patients was 60.9 years. We tested 20 free controls for free thyroxine (FT4), thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), creatinine and albumin in serum, and the quantity of urine protein. The mean results found for TSH were higher in the patients with proteinuria than in those of the controls (2.719 mU/l vs 1.78 mU/l). For FT4, the mean result in the patients with proteinuria was 17.04 pmol/l vs 16.39 pmol/l. in the controls. A correlation was sought between TSH and FT4 levels and all the laboratory parameters we tested. Patients with proteinuria had higher TSH levels, probably due to the loss of thyroid hormones in the urine. However, these losses cannot lead to clinically proven hypothyroidism.

Open access

Maya P. Danovska, Margarita L. Alexandrova and Irena I. Gencheva

Summary

Individuals with hypertension and diabetes mellitus are at high risk of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Recent advances in the multifactorial pathophysiology of atherogenesis provide important information about the complex interrelations between traditional risk factors, inflammation and oxidative stress in mediating all stages of atherosclerosis. The objective of the study was to determine if some inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in patients with arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus differ from those in healthy age-matched controls. Our results revealed a significant difference in blood pro/antioxidant activities in hypertensive diabetics and the controls. The investigation of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers along with traditional risk factors proves useful in complex assessment of vascular risk and primary prophylaxis of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular events.