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  • Author: Ioana Rodean x
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Abstract

Coronary artery disease represents a major cause of morbidity and mortality around the world. Unstable angina pectoris is a serious manifestation of ischemic heart disease and represents an acute condition caused by the narrowing of the coronary lumen as the result of an atheromatous plaque formation. In most cases the trigger of this process is represented by the rupture of a plaque that has become vulnerable or unstable. The first-line intracoronary imaging technique for the evaluation of plaque vulnerability is optical coherence tomography, which can measure the thickness of the fibrous cap (a significant predictor of plaque vulnerability) and can also assess other characteristics of plaque vulnerability (macrophage infiltration, lipid pool, intracoronary thrombus, or neointimal rupture). We present the case of a 67-year-old male with symptoms suggestive of unstable angina pectoris, caused by the presence of a vulnerable plaque on the left main coronary artery, where optical coherence tomography had a significant contribution in identifying the etiology of chest pain.

Abstract

Usually, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction based on patient symptoms, electrocardiogram (ECG) changes, and cardiac enzymes, is not a challenge for cardiologists. The correlation between coronary anatomy and the ECG territories that present ischemic changes can help the clinician to estimate which coronary artery presents lesions upon performing a coronary angiogram. In certain situations, the diagnosis of myocardial infarction can be difficult due to the lack of correlations between the clinical and paraclinical examinations and the coronary angiogram. In some cases, patients with chest pain and ST-segment elevation on the ECG tracing present with a normal coronary angiography. In other cases, patients without important changes on the ECG can present critical lesions or even occlusions upon angiographic examination. The aim of this article is to highlight the role of noninvasive coronary magnetic resonance and multi-slice computed tomography in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction and normal coronary angiography.

Abstract

Coronary fistulas are rare, not gender-specific congenital conditions, consisting of communications between the coronary arteries and either another coronary vessel or a cardiac chamber. In contrast to large fistulas, small fistulas, named “minimae cordis veneae” or the Thebesius venous system, are draining into heart chambers and form a vascular network in the cardiac lumen. In this article, we present the case of a 72-year-old female with a significant history of cardiovascular disease, admitted to our clinic because of rest dyspnea, fatigue, and minimal chest pain. The 12-lead electrocardiogram showed a trifascicular block (a second-degree atrioventricular block Mobitz II, associated with a right bundle branch block and left anterior fascicle block) and negative T waves in DII, DIII, aVF, V4–V6 leads. An invasive coronary angiography was performed, which revealed no significant atherosclerotic lesions. However, a persistent capillary blush was present at the apex site of the left ventricular chamber, draining from the distal segments of both the anterior descending coronary artery and the posterior interventricular coronary artery. The intramural vascular network generating a left ventricle angiogram image of this kind was suggestive for persistent Thebesian vessels connecting the two coronaries with the left ventricular chamber.

Abstract

Patients with coronary artery anomalies are more susceptible to develop acute thrombotic coronary occlusions due to the abnormal anatomy of these arteries and the disturbance of the pathophysiological mechanisms that lead to an accelerated atherosclerosis development. The following article presents the case of a 64-year-old female patient diagnosed with anterior ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The patient underwent primary percutaneous coronary intervention, which revealed the absence of the right coronary artery and separated origins of the left anterior descending artery and the left circumflex artery from the aorta.

Abstract

For a better assessment of ischemic heart diseases, myocardial viability should be quantified. Current studies underline the importance and the evolution of several techniques and methods used in the evaluation of myocardial viability. Taking into account these considerations, the aim of this manuscript was to present the recent points of view regarding myocardial viability and its clinical significance in patients with ischemic cardiomyopathies and left ventricular dysfunction. On the other hand, the manuscript points out the role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), one of the most useful noninvasive imaging techniques, in the assessment of myocardial viability. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of cardiac MRI, its usefulness can be better appreciated by the clinician. In the following years, it is considered that MRI will be an indispensable imaging tool in the assessment of ischemic heart disease, guiding interventions for revascularization and long-term risk stratification in patients with stable angina or myocardial infarction.

Abstract

Recent studies have shown that systemic inflammation caused by periodontal disease (PD) can determine important changes in the coronary arteries, favoring atherosclerosis progression and the development of acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The aim of the ATHERODENT study (Protocol Record Number CM0117-ATD) is to assess the interrelation between PD, inflammation, and the progression of coronary atherosclerosis in patients with ACS.

Material and methods: This case-control observational study will enroll 100 patients (group 1 – ACS and associated PD, and group 2 – ACS and no PD), in whom the following data will be collected: (1) demographic and clinical data; (2) cardiovascular risk factors; (3) full characterization of PD markers; (4) systemic inflammatory biomarkers; (5) imaging biomarkers derived from transthoracic echocardiography, computed tomography, coronary angiography, optical coherence tomography, and intravascular ultrasound; and (6) assessment of the presence of specific oral bacteria in samples of coronary plaques collected by coronary atherectomy, which will be performed during percutaneous revascularization interventions, when indicated in selected cases, in the atherectomy sub-study. The follow-up will be performed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 15, 18, and 24 months. The primary endpoint of the study will be represented by the rate of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in PD vs. non-PD patients and in correlation with: (1) the level of systemic inflammation triggered by PD and/or by ACS at baseline; (2) the vulnerability degree of atheromatous plaques in the coronary tree (culprit and non-culprit lesions); and (3) the presence and burden of oral bacteria in atheromatous plaques. Secondary endpoints will be represented by: (1) the rate of progression of vulnerability degree of non-culprit coronary plaques; (2) the rate of progression of atheromatous burden and calcium scoring of the coronary tree; and (3) the rate of occurrence of left ventricular remodeling and post-infarction heart failure. The ATHERODENT study has been registered in clinicaltrials.gov (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03395041).

Abstract

Arteriovenous fistulas are abnormal vascular communications between the arterial and venous system and may lead to the development of arteriovenous shunts. These malformations are extremely rare, and their diagnosis can be difficult due to the lack of symptoms or the absence of hemodynamic consequences. In many cases, arteriovenous fistulas are discovered by chance. In this brief report, we present the case of a 31-year-old male with symptoms suggestive of angina pectoris, tachycardia-bradycardia syndrome and multiple episodes of syncope. Multi-slice computed tomography revealed the presence of multiple mediastinal fistulas connecting the aorta, superior vena cava, pulmonary veins and azygos system.

Abstract

Stem cell-based therapy is a new therapeutic option that can be used in patients with cardiac diseases caused by myocardial injury. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new noninvasive imaging method with an increasingly widespread indication. The aim of this review was to evaluate the role of cardiac MRI in patients with myocardial infarction undergoing stem cell therapy. We studied the role of MRI in the assessment of myocardial viability, stem cell tracking, assessment of cell survival rate, and monitoring of the long-term effects of stem cell therapy. Based on the current knowledge in this field, this noninvasive, in vivo cardiac imaging technique has a large indication in this group of patients and plays an important role in all stages of stem cell therapy, from the indication to the long-term follow-up of patients.