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  • Author: Ilona Tandzegolskienė x
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Open access

Giedrė Tamoliūnė, Elena Trepulė and Ilona Tandzegolskienė

Abstract

The discussions about work and family reconciliation have revealed the fact that it is essential to talk about division of roles and agreements in the family, the skills important for career management, “here and now” search for the solutions to various problematic situations, flexibility and ability to get involved in work activity at the same time respecting family needs. Seeking reconciliation of family and career, family needs have been linked to positive parenthood and at the same time work tendencies and career opportunities have been estimated. Here we face some obstacles which are common to the aspiration of harmony and satisfaction in family, work or while developing career opportunities. The goal of this empirical study – to discuss common grounds and distinguish needs and challenges of young families, employers and career counsellors for successful reconciliation of family and career. A qualitative research included narratives of young parents, interviews with employers and a focus group interview with career counsellors. The data received from the narrative has been interpreted according to thematic analysis method and the interview data of focus group has been presented by dividing the data into categories and subcategories. Results have demonstrated that young parents’ experiences intertwine with employers’ experiences in some cases while career counsellors are expected to provide guidance and support to facilitate the potential conflict although there are still gaps in this service provision.

Open access

Ilona Tandzegolskienė and Asta Balčiūnaitienė

Summary

The article aims to present the storytelling method, which could be applied in teaching/learning foreign languages. Storytelling enables learners to analyse actual topics using the gathered information, to solve problems emphasizing personal experiences and values as well as to listen to other stories and share valuable information. On the one hand, communicative skills are developed through storytelling processes at the same time improving students’ pronunciation, increasing vocabulary, brushing up their grammatical and sentence structure skills. Moreover, young learners’ problem-solving skills are also developed, when they try to remember the received information and answer the questions during the limited time. On the other hand, the use of storytelling method enables teachers to inspire young learners to share their experiences, and to improve their linguistic abilities. The participation in these information sharing activities motivate young learners to be open-minded and encourage them to study individually. The article overviews the importance of the storytelling method on the theoretical level as well as introduces the usefulness of storytelling elements in foreign language classes on the empirical level. The research was planned and performed in X Kaunas Gymnasium, in which the second-grade young learners (average age of the participants was 16 years old) created and presented their stories on the topic “My Festive Day”. The results of the research demonstrate that young learners were more engaged in prepared materials and managed to communicate using new linguistic constructions. What is more, while listening to other presenters they learned about various holiday traditions, different personal attitudes and, consequently, improved their listening, sentence structure and other communicative skills. The participants of the research emphasized that it was interesting for them to prepare storytelling tasks – to write, read the material and to activate the gained information. During the implementation of the storytelling method, a negative aspect related to emotions was observed, and also a lack of stress management and learning to learn skills was determined.

Open access

Vilma Žydžiūnaitė, Ilona Tandžegolskienė and Ausra Rutkienė

Abstract

Analysis of the scientific literature has shown that the mission of a scientist is inherent to an individual and is oriented towards institution and activity or performance being implemented in higher education. Every higher education school defines its mission and vision, thus the aim of a scientist is to act according to the provided institutional mission. Academic staff at higher education schools, according to the attributed roles, performs various activities which are associated with teaching and research, administration and human resources management, work in labour services. According to the roles and activities being distinguished and described, diverging concepts exist for handling the academic staff roles. The aim of conceptual research refers to consideration and description of a scientist’s missions and roles in higher education generally and a higher education school specifically. The answers to the following research questions are provided in the article: What are the levels of a scientist missions in higher education? How the roles of a scientist could be defined in higher education referring to autonomy or interdependence? What competencies are attributed to the roles of a scientist in higher education? The research concludes that the mission of a scientist is related to the multi-layered concept covering the roles, context, organizational structure and values in a higher education institution. It is essential for a scientist to perceive and define their own mission(s), role(s), responsibilities and obligations to a higher education school, students, science, and society. The mission of a scientist in a higher education school rests in certain combination of diverse competencies being applied on both organizational and individual levels. In summary, academic staff roles are entwined and contrasting with each other. However, the roles of a researcher and a teacher are linked in general as the role of a teacher requires accomplishing academic staff activities such as planning learning activities, devoting time to consultations, meetings and discussions with students.