Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Ihsan Yilmaz x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Ihsan Yilmaz, Greg Barton and James Barry

Abstract

For decades, Turkish Islamists have failed to attract the votes of large sections of society and remained marginal. As a result of this failure to come to power, and due to domestic and international constraints and windows of opportunities, they have declared that they have jettisoned Islamism. Many Turkish Muslims whose religious disposition was shaped by the pluralistic urban Ottoman experience and small-town Anatolian traditionalism, and by the contesting currents of cosmopolitan pluralism and rural social conservatism, voted in favour of these former Islamists who have become “Muslim Democrats”. This paper elaborates on the genealogy of Turkish Islamists and their political trajectories and argues that when the forces and constraints of domestic and external social, political and economic conditions disappeared and the opportunities derived from being Muslim Democrats no longer existed, the former Islamists easily returned to their original ideology, showing that despite assertions to the contrary their respect for democracy and pluralism had not truly been internalised. This paper also aims to demonstrate that similar to other authoritarian populists, Erdoganists perceive the state and its leader as more important than anything else and as being above everything else, which has culminated in a personality cult and sanctification of the state. As long as Turkey’s economy continued to boom, almost everyone was happy that Turkey could readily market the “Muslim Democrats” story to the whole world for a long period as a major success story, or as an “exemplary Muslim country” or “model”. Yet, Middle Eastern elites and Western forces got carried away and learnt the hard way just how naive their view was in perhaps the first great transformation movement of the twenty-first century – the Arab Spring. Likewise, the Turkish Spring turned all too quickly towards autumn and then winter.

Open access

Bulent Ekiz, Alper Yilmaz, Hulya Yalcintan, Akin Yakan, Ismail Yilmaz and Ihsan Soysal

Abstract

Carcass and meat quality of male and female Anatolian water buffaloes were investigated using 10 carcasses from each gender. Gender had no influence on carcass characteristics, except warm carcass weight, which was 13% higher in males compared to females. Meat from male water buffaloes had higher ultimate pH and lightness (L*), but lower redness (a*) values than females. Meat samples aged for 21 days had lower values for expressed juice, cooking loss and Warner Bratzler shear force compared with those of 7-day aged ones. Meat samples aged for 21 days had higher L* value at 1 h and 24 h after cutting, a* value at 1 h after cutting compared with those of 7-day aged meat samples. Gender had no effect on meat sensory characteristics. Meat from male water buffaloes had higher proportions of C14:0, C18:3 n-3, C20:2 n-6, C20:3 n-3 and C20:4 n-6 and Σn-3 fatty acids and lower Σn-6/Σn-3 ratio compared with female water buffaloes.

Open access

Ihsan Ates, B. Katipoglu, B. Copur and N. Yilmaz

Abstract

Objectives. Hypophysitis is a heterogeneous inflammatory disease of pituitary gland. As it causes headache and visual defects, it mimics sellar tumors in clinical and radiological aspects. It may occur due to primary or secondary causes. Tuberculosis is one of the rare secondary causes of the hypophysitis. Subject and Results. A 30-year-old male patient presented with fatigue and headache. Panhypopituitarism was considered due to the results and the diagnostic magnetic resonance (MR) imaging revealed sagittal section diamater of pituitary gland higher than normal. Biopsy of the pituitary gland was concordant with the granulomatous hypophysitis. Other possible diagnosis was excluded. Conclusion. The tubercular hypophysitis, as a result of performed tests, is discussed hereby, in the case report.