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  • Author: Ibrahim Edhemovic x
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The influence of the distal resection margin length on local recurrence and long- term survival in patients with rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy and sphincter- preserving rectal resection

Abstract

Background

Low recurrence rates and long term survival are the main therapeutic goals of rectal cancer surgery. Complete, margin- negative resection confers the greatest chance for a cure. The aim of our study was to determine whether the length of the distal resection margin was associated with local recurrence rate and long- term survival.

Patients and methods

One hundred and nine patients, who underwent sphincter-preserving resection for locally advanced rectal cancer after preoperative chemoradiotherapy between 2006 and 2010 in two tertiary referral centres were included in the study. Distal resection margin lengths were measured on formalin-fixed, pinned specimens. Characteristics of patients with distal resection margin < 8 mm (Group I, n = 27), 8–20 mm (Group II, n = 31) and > 20 mm (Group III, n = 51) were retrospectively analysed and compared. Median (range) follow-up time in Group I was 89 (51–111), in Group II 83 (57–111) and in Group III 80 (45–116) months (p = 0.326), respectively.

Results

Univariate survival analysis showed that distal resection margin length was not statistically significantly associated with overall survival or local recurrence rate (p > 0.05). In a multiple Cox regression analysis, after adjusting for pathologic T and N stage (yT, yN), distal resection margin length was still not statistically significantly associated with overall survival.

Conclusions

Our study shows that close distal resection margins can be accepted as oncologically safe for sphincter-preserving rectal resections after preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

Open access
Ultrasonographic changes in the liver tumors as indicators of adequate tumor coverage with electric field for effective electrochemotherapy

Abstract

Background

The aim of the study was to characterize ultrasonographic (US) findings during and after electrochem-otherapy of liver tumors to determine the actual ablation zone and to verify the coverage of the treated tumor with a sufficiently strong electric field for effective electrochemotherapy.

Patients and methods

US findings from two representative patients that describe immediate and delayed tumor changes after electrochemotherapy of colorectal liver metastases are presented.

Results

The US findings were interrelated with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Electrochemotherapy-treated tumors were exposed to electric pulses based on computational treatment planning. The US findings indicate immediate appearance of hyperechogenic microbubbles along the electrode tracks. Within minutes, the tumors became evenly hyperechogenic, and simultaneously, an oedematous rim was formed presenting as a hypoechogenic formation which persisted for several hours after treatment. The US findings overlapped with computed electric field distribution in the treated tissue, indicating adequate coverage of tumors with sufficiently strong electric field, which may predict an effective treatment outcome.

Conclusions

US provides a tool for assessment of appropriate electrode insertion for intraoperative electrochemo-therapy of liver tumors and assessment of the appropriate coverage of a tumor with a sufficiently strong electric field and can serve as predictor of the response of tumors.

Open access
Induction chemotherapy, chemoradiotherapy and consolidation chemotherapy in preoperative treatment of rectal cancer - long-term results of phase II OIGIT-01 Trial

Abstract

Background

The purpose of the study was to improve treatment efficacy for locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by shifting half of adjuvant chemotherapy preoperatively to one induction and two consolidation cycles.

Patients and methods

Between October 2011 and April 2013, 66 patients with LARC were treated with one induction chemotherapy cycle followed by chemoradiotherapy (CRT), two consolidation cycles, surgery and three adjuvant capecitabine cycles. Radiation doses were 50.4 Gy for T2-3 and 54 Gy for T4 tumours in 1.8 Gy daily fraction. The doses of concomitant and neo/adjuvant capecitabine were 825 mg/m2/12h and 1250mg/m2/12h, respectively. The primary endpoint was pathologic complete response (pCR).

Results

Forty-three (65.1%) patients were treated according to protocol. The compliance rates for induction, consolidation, and adjuvant chemotherapy were 98.5%, 93.8% and 87.3%, respectively. CRT was completed by 65/66 patients, with G ≥ 3 non-hematologic toxicity at 13.6%. The rate of pCR (17.5%) was not increased, but N and the total-down staging rates were 77.7% and 79.3%, respectively. In a median follow-up of 55 months, we recorded one local relapse (LR) (1.6%). The 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 64.0% (95% CI 63.89–64.11) and 69.5% (95% CI 69.39–69.61), respectively.

Conclusions

In LARC preoperative treatment intensification with capecitabine before and after radiotherapy is well tolerated, with a high compliance rate and acceptable toxicity. Though it does not improve the local effect, it achieves a high LR rate, DFS, and OS.

Open access