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Vaishaly K. Bharambe, Hetal Rathod and Kalpana Angadi

Abstract

Introduction. All over the world people on organ transplant waiting lists die due to shortage of donor organs. The success of organ donation program needs education of the population regarding organ donation for which healthcare professionals are most suitable. The present study was taken up to assess the knowledge and attitude of 1st, 2nd and 3rd year medical students about organ donation. Methods. A specially designed self-administered questionnaire was distributed amongst all willing 1st, 2nd and 3rd year medical students at our Medical College and later analyzed statistically. Results. A total of 157, 145 and 92 students from each year of medical education respectively gave their consent for participation in the study. Awareness regarding organ donation was found to be 98.7-100%, 69.4% claimed television as their source of information regarding organ donation and 46.7% stated that it is possible for patient to recover from brain death. The awareness regarding eye, liver, heart and kidney donations was found to be 92.4%, 87%, 87% and 97.8%, respectively. 87% of medical students were aware of need for legal supervision, and awareness regarding the existing laws was found to be 57.6%. Conclusion. Medical students had a high level of awareness and a positive attitude towards organ donation. However, knowledge regarding “brain-death”, organs and tissues donated, legislation and ethical issues was poor. A teaching intervention designed to specifically address these issues could help increase the confidence of the health-care professionals and may result finally in increased organ procurement rates.

Open access

Vaishaly K. Bharambe, Vasanti U. Arole, Vatsalaswamy Puranam, Purushottam Manvikar and Hetal K. Rathod

Abstract

Introduction. To study the knowledge and attitude of a medical student doing internship with regards to organ donation. Methods. A total of 50 specially designed questionnaires were distributed among medical students doing internship at a medical college. Those who gave their consent to participate in the study were asked to fill out the questionnaire. Results. 86% gave their consent to participate in the study. 100% were aware of the concept of organ donation. 68% had obtained this knowledge from newspapers. 4% had obtained knowledge from the Medical College. 48%, 48% and 34% believed that an organ donor was live, brain dead and cardiac dead, respectively. Awareness regarding kidney, eye, liver, heart and skin donation was found to be 82%, 80%, 80%, 62% and 64%, respectively. 54% were aware of Law pertaining to organ donation. 90% were either positive or willing to consider organ donation themselves. 10% felt that the donated organ might be misused. Conclusion. Health care professionals are the first to establish relationship with the potential donor’s family and are a crucial link in the organ procurement process. Their attitude and level of knowledge regarding organ donation would reflect directly on the organ donation activity of any region. The interns in the present study had positive attitude towards organ donation but were lacking in knowledge about some key aspects such as brain death and legality involved in organ donation. Majority of the medical professionals had obtained their knowledge from newspapers and very few were taught about organ donation in the medical college. If education on organ donation and its various aspects was included in medical curriculum, it could empower the future medical care professionals with knowledge to further study the cause of organ donation and serve the society better.