Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 3 of 3 items for

  • Author: Henry Wilde x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Henry Wilde

Abstract

Clement Alfred Finch was a physician, researcher and educator who helped advance the scientific basis and practices of diagnosis and treatment of anemia since the time when little was known about the disease. He was born in New York, USA and graduated from medical school in 1941. He had a 60-year tenure at the University of Washington and published extensively (more than 300 scholarly articles and close to 30 key reviews). He was instrumental in collaborating with key Thai hematologists, particularly at the premier Siriraj Medical School. His contribution on iron metabolization in the bloodstream has been a corner stone of hematology. It included seminal research which led to the widespread supplementation with iron in diets by women to avoid iron deficiency anemia.

Open access

Gyanendra Gongal, S.M. Mudhusudana, M.K. Sudarshan, B.J. Mahendra, Thiravat Hemachudha and Henry Wilde

Abstract

Admission of a human rabies case to hospital often creates great anxiety among staff that fear contamination. The care of a rabies patient requires only standard infectious precautions consisting of basic preventive measure applied in many other common diseases. This should be sufficient to prevent transmission to staff. Therefore, prevention of anxiety among health care workers should be an achievable goals.

Open access

Apichart Thanapatcharoen, Kanok Preativatanyou, Atchara Phumee, Kanyarat Kraivichain, Prasert Sitthicharoenchai, Henry Wilde and Padet Siriyasatien

Abstract

Background: Myiasis is the infestation with fly larvae in live vertebrate hosts. The disease has not been reported in Thailand.

Method and Results: We report the first case series of cutaneous myiasis caused by Dermatobia hominis in two Thai travelers who visited Brazil. Two of five travelers were infested with D. hominis larvae. Both presented with furuncular lesions. Surgical excision was performed for both patients and the larvae were removed. They were identified as second stage of D. hominis. Sequence data of both mitochondrial and nuclear genes of the larva were similar to previous reports from Brazil.

Conclusion: With increasing travel into endemic countries of D. hominis, physician should be aware of this parasitic infestation.