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Adhikari Harasankar

Abstract

The present study was conducted among the employed women (N=50) at their reproductive age (25-35 years) of urban Kolkata to elucidate their changing attitudes towards infertility and motherhood. We found that the women were very much attentive to their personal happiness and career. They did not believe to perform their traditional female roles because in their opinion it was a restriction of achieving their equity and justice in our patriarchal society. They were engrossed into most modern urban mode of life. They did not prefer to enter into their marital relation because it would be a threat to cherish their happiness. Even in their opinion infertility would not be a stigma in women’s lives because it would be an obstacle for their freedom and self progress in their working life. But they would prefer to enjoy the taste of motherhood otherwise rather than biologically. Thus reproductive rights of women were violated through their overall behaviour.

Open access

Harasankar Adhikari

Abstract

The post global era is signified in terms of women’s changed status in the patriarchal society of India. Their participation in the work force is not experienced as good or as desired because they have to face rampant violence related to their reorganized desires. The media-bound culture is a prime cause of their mimetic behavior in lifestyle and other choices. This paper attempts to raise two questions: Might this be the major cause of the violence? Is there a relationship between consumerism and women’s body as sex commodity?

Open access

Harasankar Adhikari

Abstract

Social work is a sharing and caring profession based on scientific methods. This problem solving profession makes people self-reliant and self-dependent when he/she is in any sorts of crises. Thus, it differs from relief work, social services or social welfare delivered during emergence crises. This paper examined the application of professional social work as relief work, which did not bring any change among the beneficiaries; rather it set their mind as opportunist. For this purpose, the programme sponsored by the government of India and implemented by nongovernmental organizations for rehabilitation of the street children (i.e., pavements and slums dwellers, children of sex workers, and so forth) of Metro cities like Kolkata had priority. This evaluative study assessed the progress and changes among 500 street children who were the beneficiaries for 10 years of the programme, selected according to their parental residents/occupation through stratified sampling. Interviews, case studies and group interaction were used to collect data on various aspects, i.e. personal background, education, and occupation of these children. It revealed that after almost 10 years of services, the problem of children was static. Firstly, service delivery system was as relief work. The methods of social work were not implied while the professionals were in implementation. On the other hand, the scope of monitoring and evaluation of the programme by government was suspended due to several reasons. Definitely, the politicalization in human development would be restricted. The problems of suffering would be root out and it should not be a continued process.

Open access

HARASANKAR ADHIKARI

Abstract

This paper attempts to discuss the causes of violence against women in India in relation to their body-revealing dress and conditional consent to sexual relations. Historically, women in Indian society have been victims of gender practices under the typical patriarchy. Culturally, women are treated as sex objects and their status is bounded within the periphery of feminine role-relations as housekeepers and pro-creators of generation. Women's education and participation in the workforce are not bringing with them the expected changes in gender stereotyped-ness. Even the work done on gender justice and women's human rights has failed to establish their status as anything more than sex objects. The rampant sexual violence against women is a reminder that the problem is deeply rooted in Indian society. In such a situation we may not be able to avoid considering the responsibility of women. Their body-revealing clothing and conditional consent to sexual relation are significant in provoking men into treating them as sex objects. So we should think about how to bring about a change in gender practices and this should start in each and every family. The family as a correctional institution should teach its offspring about gender equality and their behavior and attitude towards gender should regard the physical and physiological differences between the sexes as minor. This might perhaps be a step towards reducing violence against women.