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  • Author: Hana Vymazalová x
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Shepespuptah Idu According to Evidence from his Rock-Cut Tomb at Abusir South

Abstract

The article discusses evidence uncovered by the mission of the Czech Institute of Egyptology, Faculty of Arts, Charles University in Prague at the necropolis of Abusir near Egypt’s capital Cairo. The tomb of Shepespuptah Idu was one of the four rock-cut tombs in the tomb complex of Princess Sheretnebty in Abusir South. It was uncovered in 2012 and its exploration continued until 2013. The identity of the tomb owner is known from hieratic inscriptions in his tomb chapel, which tell us about his name, nickname and titles. Shepespuptah held administrative titles associated with legal matters and royal offerings and the latter offices connect him with the economy of the royal funerary cults. The burial of Shepespuptah, which was found in his sarcophagus reveals interesting details about his health.

Open access
A Note on an Incised Inscription from Djedkare’s Pyramid Complex

Abstract

During the documentation of Djedkare’s pyramid complex at south Saqqara, a block with an incised inscription was uncovered, containing the titles and names of two Old Kingdom officials. The date of the inscription is unknown, but the titles of the two individuals indicate that they may have been connected to the construction of royal monuments and their provision.

Open access
Secondary Burial Ground in the Pyramid Complex of King Djedkare: A Preliminary Report on Burials with Grave Goods

Abstract

The exploration of the pyramid complex of King Djedkare at south Saqqara in 2018 revealed a large number of secondary burials. These burials were found between the north part of the king’s funerary precinct and in the south part of his queen’s precinct in an area which had not been previously excavated. This brief preliminary study presents the archaeological frame together with the results of the osteological examination of a small group of burials which contained grave goods. This study shows that at this burial ground, grave goods were associated mostly with immature individuals, and in a smaller number of cases with adult women, while no adult male burial with grave goods was documented in this group.

Open access