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Open access

Genta Cekodhima, Altin Cekodhima, Arben Beqiri, Mehdi Alimehmeti and Gerhard Sulo

Abstract

Background

Colorectal polyps (CP) are common among individuals older than 50 years. Some polyp types can precede colorectal cancer (CRC). This study aimed at describing histopathological characteristics of colorectal polyps in relation to age and gender among symptomatic patients referred for a colonoscopy examination during 2011-2014 in Tirana, Albania.

Methods

Study population included 267 individuals aged ≥ 20 years and diagnosed with ≥ 1 polyp during a colonoscopy examination. A total of 346 polyps were identified, excised and measured, and underwent histopathological examination.

Results

Adenomas accounted for 79.8% of all polyps and tubular type was the most frequent one (74.4%). The majority of polyps (42.5%) were small (<1 cm), 38.7% of a medium size (1-2 cm) and 18.8% large (>2 cm). Adenomas were larger than non-adenomatous polyps (p<0.01)

There was no gender difference with regard to patient age (p=0.22) or polyp size (p=0.84) Adenomas were more frequent among men compared to women (p=0.02). Age was strongly related to polyp characteristics. The proportion of adenomas increased significantly with age (p<0.01). Within adenomas, the proportion of villous types - a precursor of colorectal cancer - increased remarkably with age (p=0.01). Older age was positively associated with potentially malignant adenomas (defined as adenomas > 1 cm and showing high-grade dysplasia) (p<0.01).

Conclusion

Adenomas accounted for the majority of polyps. Their morphology, size and malignant potential were related to patient age.

Open access

Sokol Myftiu, Enxhela Sulo, Genc Burazeri, Bledar Daka, Ilir Sharka, Artan Shkoza and Gerhard Sulo

Abstract

Background

The clinical profile of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients reflects the burden of risk factors in the general population. Differences between incident (first) and recurrent (repeated) events and their impact on treatment are poorly described. We studied potential differences in the clinical profile and in-hospital treatment between patients hospitalised with an incident and recurrent AMI.

Methods

A total of 324 patients admitted in the Coronary Care Unit of ‘Mother Teresa’ hospital, Tirana, Albania (2013-2014), were included in the study. Information on AMI type, complications and risk factors was obtained from patient’s medical file.

Logistic regression analyses were used to explore differences between the incident and recurrent AMIs regarding clinical profile and in-hospital treatment.

Results

Of all patients, 50 (15.4%) had a prior AMI. Compared to incident cases, recurrent cases were older (P=0.01), more often women (P=0.01), less educated (P=0.01), and smoked less (P=0.03). Recurrent cases experienced more often heart failure (HF) (OR=2.48; 95% CI: 1.31–4.70), impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (OR=1.97; 95% CI:1.05–3.71), and multivessel disease (OR=6.32; 95% CI: 1.43–28.03) than incident cases. In-hospital use of beta-blockers was less frequent among recurrent compared to incident cases (OR=0.45; 95% CI: 0.24–0.85), while no statistically significant differences between groups were observed regarding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, statin, aspirin or invasive procedures.

Conclusion

A more severe clinical expression of the disease and underutilisation of treatment among recurrent AMIs are likely to explain their poorer prognosis compared to incident AMIs.