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Vanessa Torres van Grinsven and Ger Snijkers

Abstract

The perceptions and sentiments of business respondents are considered important for statistical bureaus. As perceptions and sentiments are related to the behavior of the people expressing them, gaining insights into the perceptions and sentiments of business respondents is of interest to understand business survey response. In this article we present an exploratory analysis of expressions in the social media regarding Statistics Netherlands. In recent years, social media have become an important infrastructure for communication flows and thus an essential network in our social structure. Within that network participants are actively involved in expressing sentiments and perceptions. The results of our analysis provide insights into the perceptions and sentiments that business respondents have of this national statistical institute and specifically its business surveys. They point towards the specific causes that have led to a positive or a negative sentiment. Based on these results, recommendations aimed at influencing the perceptions and sentiments will be discussed, with the ultimate goal of stimulating survey participation. We also suggest recommendations regarding social media studies on sentiments and perceptions of survey respondents.

Open access

Katherine J. Thompson, Polly Phipps, Darcy Miller and Ger Snijkers

Open access

Gert Buiten, Ger Snijkers, Paulo Saraiva, Johan Erikson, Anna-Greta Erikson and Alice Born

Abstract

This article discusses the experience and the ideas of National Statistical Institutes from four countries – Portugal, Sweden, Canada, and the Netherlands – in order to build a fully automated data collection system, to provide a system-to-system (S2S) data exchange or Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) between all stakeholders in the production chain. This joint work is a summary of an invited session at the Fifth International Conference on Establishment Surveys, which was devoted to ‘the future of business data collection’. Taken together, the four presentations provide an overview of recent experiences with S2S/EDI data collection for financial business data. The basis for such a system is an integrated unbroken digital information chain that runs from the recording of financial data in computerised administrative systems of individual businesses all the way to publishing economic statistics – the Business Information Chain. This chain can be ‘closed’ and made into a cycle by including a feedback loop, for example by providing benchmark data to businesses. However, to make it happen, technical standardisation, vertical and horizontal conceptual harmonisation between all partners in the chain, and positive business cases for all partners are needed. The article starts by putting EDI developments in historical perspective.