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Open access

Elvira Kalaitzaki, George Kollaros and Antonia Athanasopoulou

Abstract

The load transfer capacity of pavements is to a great extend influenced by aggregates. About 85% of the total volume of hot mix asphalt (HMA) mixtures consists of aggregates; thus, they are greatly influenced by aggregate properties like angularity (shape), roughness (texture), and gradation. Aggregate gradation controls the structure of voids. Current specifications for aggregate properties in HMA pavements require the aggregate blend to fall within a specified range of gradation values. Although the abovementioned requirement has ensured the construction of high quality HMA pavements, the properties are largely empirical and they are not based on performance-related tests. Marshall Stability is in principle the resistance to plastic flow of cylindrical specimens of a bituminous mixture loaded on the lateral surface. It is the load carrying capacity of the mix at 60oC. Aggregates with different gradations from the broader area of Xanthi, Northern Greece, have been used to prepare specimens for stability testing of hot asphalt mixtures in the laboratory. The research focused on the evaluation of the influence of aggregates in the overall stability characteristics of the mixtures. The maximum stability value has been obtained with an open-graded mixture having 5% asphalt and aggregate size 2.36 mm. However, the stability of the dense graded mixture is higher than this maximum value.

Open access

Elvira Kalaitzaki, George Kollaros and Antonia Athanasopoulou

Abstract

According to their size, aggregates are classified in coarse grained, fine grained, and fines. The determination of fines content in aggregate materials is very simple and is performed through the aggregate washing during the sieving procedure to define the gradation curve. The very fine material consists of grains having a size lower than 63 μm. The presence of fines directly influences the composition and performance of concrete and asphalt mixtures (e.g. asphalt content, elasticity, fracture). The strength and load carrying capacity of hot mix asphalt (HMA) results from the aggregate framework created through particle-particle contact and interlock. Fines or mineral filler have a role in HMA. The coarse aggregate framework is filled by the sand-sized material and finally by the mineral filler. At some point, the smallest particles lose contact becoming suspended in the binder not having the particle-particle contact that is created by the larger particles. The overall effect of mineral filler in hot mix asphalt specimens has been investigated through a series of laboratory tests. It is clear that a behaviour influenced by the adherence of fines to asphalt film has been developed. The optimum bitumen content requirement in case of stone filler is almost the same as that for fly ash. It has been found that the percentage of fly ash filler is crucial if it exceeds approximately a value of 4%.