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  • Author: Flavia Marisi x
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9. The Concept of Nature and Its Applications in the Legal, Musical and Educational Fields

Abstract

The concept of nature changed over time, modifying the relationship between nature and man: in some cultures man and nature are considered as deeply connected, in others definitely separated. The leading ideas about nature are reflected in work pertaining to the legal, musical and educational fields. This study provides insights into these issues, trying to highlight specific analogies which connect the concept of nature and its application in the cited fields.

Open access
Number 13 / Part I. Music. 4. Promoting Development and Change: Civil Disobedience in The Legal-Political Thinking and The Musical Field

Abstract

A public, non-violent act not abiding by a recognized rule, and conscientiously done with the intent to frustrate the latter, is called an act of civil disobedience. Those who practice civil disobedience reject a specific rule, considering it unfitting with their own ethical, religious, or artistic values, and are prepared to suffer the indignities which may greet their act. The paper offers a comparative view on civil disobedience in the legalpolitical and the musical field, basing on the conceptualizations by philosophers and legal thinkers as Thoreau, Bedau, Rawls and Dworkin, and briefly analyzing some works by Monteverdi, Mozart and Liszt as examples of civil disobedience.

Open access
Education: 3. Creativity of Continuo Players and Investment Lawyers: A Comparative Sketch

Abstract

The Creative Problem Solving theory analyzes the main steps of a creative process: problem identification and delineation, information gathering, idea generation, its evaluation, refinement, implementation, and verification. Based on the findings of this theory, the present study aims at highlighting that not only artists and composers perform their tasks in a creative way, but also professionals doing jobs which are considered as not particularly creative. This study focuses in particular on continuo players and investment lawyers, stressing the often-overlooked creative elements of these jobs. The paper’s conclusions highlight the individual and social returns of promoting creativity

Open access