Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Ewelina Pyzik x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

E. Pyzik and A. Marek

Abstract

The study attempted to analyse and characterize bacteria of the genus Staphylococcus isolated from the surface and contents of quail eggs, taking into account their phenotypic properties, biochemical reactions, antibiotic sensitivity patterns, and PCR to test for the presence of the mecA gene, which is responsible for resistance to methicillin. The study included 45 strains of the genus Staphylococcus isolated from the whites, yolks and shells of table quail eggs. The results obtained indicate that a fairly high percentage of the retail quail eggs tested were contaminated with Staphylococcus bacteria. Among the species isolated (11 in total), the most frequently occurring strains were of Staphylococcus hominis (26.7%), followed by Staphylococcus aureus (15.6%), S. xylosus and S. lentus (13.3% each), while percentages of the other Staphylococcus species were under 10%. The Staphylococcus strains tested had highly differentiated biochemical and enzymatic properties. As many as 7 biotypes were distinguished among the 7 S. aureus isolates, 6 biotypes within the species S. xylosus (6 strains tested), 5 biotypes among the 6 strains of S. lentus, but only 4 biotypes among the 12 S. hominis strains. The antibiotic sensitivity testing showed 15.5% of the strains to be resistant to one or more of the therapeutic agents tested. Moreover, some isolates exhibited intermediate sensitivity to the drugs, particularly to gentamicin (24.4%), neomycin (31.1%), streptomycin (46.7%) and Linco-Spectin (48.9%).

Open access

Ewelina Pyzik, Agnieszka Marek and Tomasz Hauschild

Abstract

The aim of the study was to provide a detailed phenotypic and genotypic characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus strains and the group of microorganisms with unusual biochemical patterns (called Staphylococcus aureus-like) isolated from table chicken eggs. All of the strains tested exhibited resistance to at least one of the 17 antibiotics tested, and 55.55% of isolates were found to be resistant to five or more of them. PCR used for detection of the methicillin resistance gene (mecA) confirmed the presence of a specific product of 533 bp in the case of two of the isolated S. aureus-like strains. Analysis of the phylogenetic relationship between eight of S. aureus and ten S. aureus-like strains distinguished 18 macrorestriction profiles following digestion with SmaI endonuclease, indicating that there were no identical strains with the same macrorestriction profile. However, the presence of methicillin-resistant strains indicates a serious risk to consumer health.

Open access

Agnieszka Marek, Ewelina Pyzik, Dagmara Stępień-Pyśniak, Tomasz Hauschild and Tomasz Banach

Abstract

The aim of the study was to identify the affinity of 10 Staphylococcus strains isolated from table chicken eggs to specific species. Preliminary analysis performed by API ID32 Staph test identified these strains as S. aureus, but they exhibited a negative reaction in the tube coagulase test. Thus, the analysed strains were initially characterised as Staphylococcus aureus-like (SAL). Further characterisation was performed by genotypic methods, using restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the coagulase gene (coa) and sequencing of the gene rpoB. An attempt was also made to identify the isolated Staphylococcus strains by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The results indicated that none of the strains tested belonged to the species S. aureus. The rpoB sequences of five isolates showed the highest sequence similarity to S. haemolyticus, three isolates to S. chromogenes, and one isolate to S. epidermidis. One strain (SAL4) remained unidentified in this analysis. The results obtained using mass spectrometry were comparable to those based on gene sequence analysis. Strain SAL4, which could not be identified by sequencing, was identified by MALDI-TOF as Staphylococcus chromogenes.

Open access

Ewelina Pyzik, Agnieszka Marek, Dagmara Stępień-Pyśniak, Renata Urban-Chmiel, Łukasz S. Jarosz and Izabella Jagiełło-Podębska

Abstract

Introduction: The study sought to characterise antimicrobial resistance among coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CNS) species recovered from broiler chickens and turkeys in Poland including the presence of 12 antimicrobial resistance genes and five classical genes of staphylococcal enterotoxins. Material and Methods: A panel of 11 antimicrobial disks evaluated the phenotypic sensitivity of the tested strains to antibiotics. Five multiplex PCR assays were performed using primer pairs for specific detection of antibiotic resistance genes and staphylococcal enterotoxin A to E genes. Results: Selected antimicrobial agent susceptibility testing revealed 100% of such in in vitro conditions to cefoxitin among strains of Staphylococcus sciuri and S. chromogenes. The blaZ (for ß-lactam) and mecA (for methicillin resistance) genes were in 58.3% and 27.5% of strains, respectively. Among genes resistant to tetracyclines, tetK was most frequent. Fewer (CNS) strains showed genes resistant to macrolides, lincosamides, and florfenicol/chloramphenicol. Multiplex PCR for classical enterotoxins (A-E) detected the see gene in two S. hominis strains, while the seb gene producing enterotoxin B was found in one strain of S. epidermidis. Conclusion: CNS strains of Staphylococcus isolated from poultry were either phenotypically or genotypically multidrug resistant. Testing for the presence of the five classical enterotoxin genes showed that CNS strains, as in the case of S. aureus strains, can be a source of food intoxications.