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  • Author: Ewa Długosz x
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Ewa Długosz, Jarosław Cendrowski, Piotr Bąska, Anna Siwińska, Halina Wędrychowicz and Marcin Wiśniewski

Abstract

The aim of the study was cloning and analysis of the entire coding sequence of hamster IL-2 by the method of RACE-PCR, its expression in Escherichia coli cells, and production of IL-2 specific antibodies. These antibodies were used to determine in vitro IL-2 production by cells derived from the spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes of Ancylostoma ceylanicum infected hamsters. The highest concentration of IL-2 was noted in supernatants from cell cultures coming from the oldest, most resistant hamsters.

Open access

Maciej Klockiewicz, Tadeusz Jakubowski, Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Justyna Bartosik and Ewa Długosz

Abstract

Introduction: Farm mink (Neovison vison) can be naturally exposed to T. canis and T. leonina pathogens on the farm. If mink were hosts, it would imply some veterinary public health as well as animal welfare issues. For this reason, the aim of the study was to determine whether mink might be definitive or paratenic hosts of these parasites. Material and Methods: Four groups of mink were infected with both parasite species using larvated eggs or feed containing mouse tissue previously infected with the parasites. Following inoculation, the infections were monitored in vivo by faecal examination for 14 weeks p.i., and then western blotting and ELISA were performed. Results: Coprology did not reveal any canine roundworm eggs, neither were nematodes found in mink intestines during post mortem examination. The specific IgG antibodies recognising excretory/secretory (ES) antigens of both parasite species were identified in mink sera. Single T. leonina tissue larvae were found in digested organs. Conclusions: Our results confirm that farm mink may contribute both T. canis and T. leonina infections. It was proved that farm mink were not their definitive hosts, and therefore mink faeces need not be considered a source of canine roundworm eggs in any soil it fertilises. Nonetheless, as farm mink may be a paratenic host for both parasite species, this may have some impact on the health and welfare of infected animals.

Open access

Maciej Klockiewicz, Małgorzata Sobczak-Filipiak, Tadeusz Jakubowski and Ewa Długosz

Abstract

Introduction: Canine roundworm T. canis and T. leonina infections were investigated in experimentally infected farm mink (Neovison vison) to describe the pattern of pathological lesions in this paratenic host. Material and Methods: Infections in mink developed following ingestion of embryonated eggs of either parasite or mice tissue infected with both parasite species. Results: Comparative analysis of haematoxylin- and eosin-stained slides showed essential differences among the experimental groups. The lesions observed included eosinophil and mononuclear inflammatory infiltrates of the intestinal wall and local lymph nodes, inflammation and haemorrhages in liver tissues, and interstitial inflammation and mineralisation of the kidneys and lungs. Larvae migrating through the minks’ bodies also caused particularly salient enlargement of lymphoid follicles in the spleen and inflammatory infiltrates of mononuclear cells in skeletal and heart muscles. Conclusions: It is assumed that histopathological lesions appeared as a local and general host response to invasive L3 T. canis and T. leonina larvae migrating through the tissues of infected farm mink. Interestingly, mink infected with embryonated eggs had more pronounced lesions than animals infected with tissue larvae. Detailed histopathological examinations of parenchymal organs and striated muscles revealed lesions resembling those observed in other paratenic host species due to toxocarosis.

Open access

Renata Wojciechowska, Ewa Hanus-Fajerska, Iwona Kamińska, Aleksandra Koźmińska, Olga Długosz-Grochowska and Anna Kapczyńska

Abstract

The southern African geophyte Lachenalia with an enormous number of species and cultivars is nowadays a commercially important plant material. There is a need for research on the optimization of growing conditions to obtain a satisfactory visual quality of potted plants, which may boost its production on the international ornamental market. Our research can be considered as an innovative study on supplemental irradiation with various light spectra in relation to flower quality of Lachenalia spp. The main objective was to examine the usefulness of LED lighting in extending the length of the natural day to a 16/8 h photoperiod in order to control the development of Lachenalia ‘Rupert’ inflorescence during greenhouse cultivation in Central-European winter time. Three light treatments were applied with red (660 nm) and blue (440 nm) light in different ratios: 100% red (100/0), 90% red mixed with 10% blue (90/10) and 80% red with 20% blue (80/20). The PPFD at the plant leaf level was approx. 150 µmol m−2 s−1. The most favourable spectrum, 90/10, induced the longest inflorescences characterized by the highest stem diameter with simultaneously the highest number of florets. Additionally, blue light increased the anthocyanin content in the corolla by about 35%, compared with plants exposed to 100% red light and non-irradiated ones (control plants). This first study on the wavelength ratios is aimed to increase the production quality of Lachenalia and indicates the need for continuation.

Open access

Agnieszka Szymczyk, Aleksandra Nowaczyńska, Maciej Korpysz, Helena Donica, Agnieszka Bojarska-Junak, Monika Długosz-Danecka, Waldemar Tomczak, Ewa Wąsik-Szczepanek and Iwona Hus

Abstract

Introduction

κ and λ serum free light chains (sFLCs) are produced during physiological lymphopoesis by plasmocytes and B lymphocytes in a constant ratio related to heavy chains. The measurement of sFLC plays an important role in the diagnosis and monitoring of patients with multiple myeloma (MM). The first reports suggested that sFLC disturbances might have prognostic value also in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Aim of the study: The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between sFLC concentration and recognized prognostic factors and clinical course of CLL. Materials and methods: The sFLC concentration was measured using a latex-enhanced immunoassay in 59 patients with newly diagnosed CLL. The relationship between sFLC concentration and time to start of the treatment (TFT), the response rate to therapy (ORR) and overall survival (OS) was assessed.

Results

A significant correlation was found between sFLC κ concentration and the clinical stage of leukemia according to Rai classification, β-2 microglobulin concentration, LDH activity, CD38 expression, as well as between sFLC λlevel and β-2 microglobulin concentration and platelet count (PLT ). There was also a correlation between the values of summated κ and λ and the clinical stage of disease according to Rai classification, β-2 microglobulin concentration, CD38 expression, white blood cells count (WBC), lymphocyte count (ALC) and hemoglobin (Hgb) concentration. The κ/λ ratio (FCLR) values were significantly different in the CD38+ and CD38- population.

Summary

Simple and reproducible clonality index, which constitutes the sFLC concentration assessment, can be an attractive, potential prognostic marker in patients with CLL, however further studies are needed on a larger group of patients especially in relation to the predictive value of sFLC.