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  • Author: Eftihia Nathanail x
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Abstract

This paper introduces a multi-stakeholder multi-criteria evaluation framework, which can be used for the assessment of the last mile distribution performance of urban freight terminals. To this end, a comparative analysis is conducted addressing two Greek urban intermodal freight terminals located at the port of Thessaloniki (ThPA) and Kuehne+Nagel (K+N)’s premises. The assessment of the terminals’ performance relies on a tailored multi-criteria Key Performance Indicator (KPI)-based evaluation framework, whereas the selection and significance of the incorporated criteria and KPIs is predetermined by the relevant responsible stakeholders, who imposed their viewpoint through an analytic hierarchy process. Results showed that ThPA was ranked first according to its performance pertaining to the role of an intermodal interchange; still, K+N’s performance index was only 8.5% lower than ThPA’s, while in specific KPIs it seems that it performs in a better way.

Road safety communication campaigns are considered as an efficient strategy to approach the wide audience and influence road users towards a safe behavior, with main aim to lead to the reduction of the number and the severity of road accidents. When designing the implementation of a campaign, it is important to plan at the same time its evaluation, so that to enable the assessment of its effectiveness. For the achievement of high reliability and the development of “clear” conclusions, the campaign evaluation should be carefully organized, following a feasible scientific design.

Towards this direction, three road safety campaigns, two local campaigns addressing drink driving and seat belt usage, and one national campaign addressing driving fatigue, were implemented and evaluated. Presenting the design components of the three campaigns and the evaluation results, this paper aims at revealing the similarities and differences of the effectiveness of road safety communication campaigns on driving behavior.

Abstract

The development of interfaces between long and short distance transport networks is associated with the general processes planned by central governmental bodies; and the degree of their efficiency depends heavily on the successful cooperation among the involved planning stakeholders at various territorial levels. At the same time, no matter how efficient the planning process may be the lack of the appropriate financial planning and the coordination of the involved stakeholders for finding the required resources, affects the development of successful long and short-distance interfaces.

Towards this direction, the aim of the present paper is to investigate the planning and financing schemes developed in longshort interconnection in representative European countries, and assess how these processes are linked to the decision-making processes at a local, regional, national and European level. In addition, obstacles and barriers in the relative processes are indicated and methods for their alleviation are proposed.

Abstract

The management models pursued in logistics terminals determine their performance to a great extent. Terminals managed by public actors usually incorporate more social criteria into their decision-making processes. In addition, private management focuses on economic viability of the initiative. Decision-making is a complex process regardless the structure of management or the decision models useddue to the fact that a wide range of diverse criteria are embedded into this process. The objective of this paper it to determine a prioritization of a set of alternative options for investment projects which were suggested by port executives taking into account criteria and evaluation that have already validated by them. In order to perform the analysis a multi-criteria decision-making model was used: the Analytic Hierachy Process. The outcomes support a low-biased and efficient strategic planning through a balanced decision-making framework.

Abstract

Fatigue is considered as a serious risk driving behavior, causing road accidents, which in many cases involve fatalities and severe injuries. According to CARE database statistics, professional drivers are indicated as a high-risk group to be involved in a fatigue-related accident. Acknowledging these statistics, a training program on driving fatigue was organized, aiming at raising awareness of professional drivers of a leading company in building materials, in Greece. Selected experimental methods were used for collecting data before and after the training program, which allowed monitoring and assessing the potential behavioural changes. A questionnaire survey was conducted before the program implementation to 162 drivers of the company, while two months after the program, the same drivers replied to a second questionnaire. Impact assessment of the program relied on statistical analysis of the responses. Results showed the degree of penetration of the training program in the professional drivers' behavior towards safe driving.

Abstract

The salient scope of this paper is to enable the knowledge and understanding of urban freight transportation and provide guidance for implementing sustainable policies and measures in a city. To achieve this goal, an evaluation framework for city logistics policies and measures is developed, which demonstrates the complexity of urban freight transportation systems, through selected performance indicators, taking into account divergent stakeholders’ interests, conflicting business models and operations. Evaluation follows a hierarchical process; sustainability disciplines (economy and energy, environment, transportation and mobility, society), applicability enablers (policy and measure maturity, social acceptance and users’ uptake), multiple criteria and indicators, capturing the lifecycle impact of policies and measures and multiple stakeholders. Apart from the multicriteria context, the framework embeds methodologies, including, Impact Assessment, Social Cost Benefit Analysis, Transferability and Adaptability, and Risk Analysis. To demonstrate its applicability a case study is set for the City of Graz assessing the establishment of an Urban Consolidation Center. Results show that there is an overall improvement of 2.2% in the Logistics Sustainability Index when comparing before and after implementation cases of the Urban Consolidation Center.

Abstract

This introductory paper gives the readers a brief description of the scope and contents of this Special Issue that consists of papers devoted to Sustainable Transport Interchanges and intermodal networks. The issue depicts the results of the EU project ALLIANCE, which addresses the topic of intermodal interconnections and presents the results of the international collaboration teams, which were established within the context of the project.

Abstract

The present paper aims at analysing the concept of “urban interchanges” as a solution towards seamless transportation and sustainable mobility. Based on an extensive review of policies, initiatives and data analysis coming from interviews and meetings with stakeholders, a coherent interchange design typology was formulated that links seamless transport and urban interchanges to spatial and urban planning. Focusing on the impact of user satisfaction as a priority towards user travel choices, a list of indicators was valuated. The comparative analysis of interchange typology performance formulated by the users’ perception regarding network accessibility, surrounding area, offered interchange time facilities and environmentally friendly services and infrastructure revealed fruitful findings on proper interchange design towards sustainability and reformation of the city-hubs into true green urban interchanges.

Abstract

The present paper concerns the design of a city port business model incorporating Public Private Partnership schemes. Extensive literature review was acquired, in order to fully comprehend the organizational schemes and state of practice of Public Private Partnerships at ports. A survey was conducted at the port of Volos, based on questionnaire and interviews, to define the functions and services of the port, which could benefit from the private involvement and improve its role as a transport interchange for all involved stakeholders. The collected data were analyzed, using a modified version of Analytic Hierarchy Process, which revealed the relevant importance of port functions and services. Three different management models were considered to tackle the most important issues that came up during the analysis and they were evaluated based on the literature; the current one, a landlord management model and a partial privatization management model. The results of this process indicated, that the landlord management model would be the most effective for the particular case of the port of Volos. The landlord model seemed to perform better in improving both the operation of the organization and the level of passenger satisfaction, through its increased management flexibility, due to the segmentation of services and reduction of bureaucracy, as well as the additional investment capital that it can attract. Based on the proposed management model, actions and measures improving on the port’s business model are recommended.

Abstract

The ever-increasing tendency of people to travel by motorized vehicles contributes significantly to air pollution and traffic problems. Active travel, namely walking and cycling, seems to be a feasible solution to the current situation in urban mobility. The present paper aims at investigating the effects of active travel in health and quality of life and determine those factors that affect travel behavior. A structured literature review was carried out, which revealed the strong association of walking/cycling with the containment of noncommunicable diseases and the invigoration of wellbeing and self-confidence. In addition, a questionnaire survey was conducted in Greece, addressing the attitudes and perceptions of 507 people towards active travel, health and quality of life. Results showed that participants have a more positive attitude about walking compared to cycling, while characteristics such as age, gender, body mass index, physical and health conditions determine active commuting and consequently life satisfaction.