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  • Author: Dragoş Boicu x
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Abstract

By comparing St. John Chrysostom’s statements on Church unity after his dismissal, one can notice serious inconsistencies between the texts written by John himself and the statements attributed to him by Palladius of Helenopolis, who attempted to attenuate the outcome of the Johannite schism. In fact, the discrepancies are considerable and the Chrysostomic epistles addressed to the oriental bishops (85-90) imply that St. John encouraged the schism.

Abstract

Despite the development of the iconographic programs, the frescoes painted by the Grecu brothers remind us not only of the large ensembles beyond the Carpathians in Walachia and Moldova but also other Transylvanian decorations. These frescoes express not only the spirit of the time or the mentality of the community to which they belonged, but they also represented an opportunity to show the painters’ originality and personality, their need for personal affirmation and artistic individuality, connected to a new sensitivity of a given historical context. The representation of the inhabiting nations in Transylvania in the Passion’s Cycle highlights the disadvantaged status of the Romanian people who were oppressed by the privileged nations: by the Habsburg military force, the inequitable judgement of Saxons and the torments inflicted by Hungarians through their policies. All of these recreate mutatis mutandis the dramatic setting in which Christ was crucified.

Abstract

Remembering the events which happened 50 years ago, this paper will attempt to point out the specific way in which the Romanian Orthodox Church reported on the 450th anniversary of the Reformation. By going through the pages of Orthodox ecclesiastical periodicals that reported on this particular moment, a growing focus on the Ecumenical Movement and the dialogue partners of other denominations can be noted, marking a beneficial openness to knowledge and understanding of other Churches.

Abstract

The present research addresses matters concerning the relationship between Church and state during the reign of Theodosius II of Rome, analyzing especially the case of legitimization of the imperial authority found in the first half of the fifth century when the Empress Pulcheria tried to identify herself with the Virgin Mary before her subjects in order to further maintain control of the state alongside her brother, Theodosius II. This paper also attempts to connect the problem of the political experiment with the development of a Marian devotion in Constantinople as a solution for pagan cults’ inculturation, reassessing Nestorius’ reaction in parallel with the position of Epiphanius of Salamina.