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  • Author: Dorota Niewiedział x
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Psychological Aspects of Diving in Selected Theoretical and Research Perspectives

Abstract

The aim of the article is to conduct a literature review in relation to the psychological aspects of diving. The acquired knowledge can currently be qualified as belonging to various branches of applied psychology, as well as underwater medicine, sports medicine, psychiatry and psychotherapy. The literature on this subject matter raises two main issues of the psychological perspective: the degree of psychological adaptation of an individual to the underwater environment, and the psychophysical condition of a man involved in a specific type of diving and the resulting skills/competences to perform underwater tasks. The article presents selected reports from around the world related to diving psychology resulting from the applied structure/classification of psychological theories, explaining various mechanisms of psychological functioning underwater. The paper presents studies from the perspective of psychodynamics, psychology of health/stress, psychology of individual differences and personality. The main conclusions indicate that in addition to the main problem of an optimal/lack of adaptation of humans to the underwater environment, there is insufficient psychological knowledge (including Polish reports) in the area of personality differences between various types of divers, their social functioning, mental health and psychoeducation with regard to underwater exposures.

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Utilising a Skin Prick Test for the determination of the presence of allergic rhinitis in divers

Abstract

Allergic rhinitis occurs in various regions of the world and affects from 10 to 40% of the population. The skin prick test is the “gold standard” for the detection of type I allergic diseases according to the Gella and Coombs classification, which is mediated by IgE. For our experiment, skin prick tests were performed on 60 divers aged between 30 and 40 years of age. The following tests for airborne allergens were used: tests for pollen from trees, grasses, cereals, weeds, proteins from house dust mites, animal hair and epidermis, and moulds. On the basis of an interview and a positive skin prick test allergic rhinitis was diagnosed in 17 divers.

Conclusions:

  1. Allergic rhinitis can cause health problems in divers and be the cause of diving accidents.
  2. The application of the skin prick test during the health qualification in the Military Maritime Health Commission, would allow the exclusion of diver candidates suffering from allergies.

Open access
The problem of experiencing anxiety among divers. Experiment in hyperbaric exposure conditions

Abstract

The aim of the article is a review of psychological literature relating to the problem of anxiety in divers, where an emphasis is placed on the degree of mental adaptation of the individual to the underwater environment, primarily highlighting the trait of anxiety and the neuroticism of a person involved in a specific type of diving. The article presents selected reports from all over the world regarding research on anxiety in divers. Treating a high level of the indicator of anxiety as a predictor of panic anxiety reveals the importance of this trait in predicting the risk of an occurrence of diving accidents during the operation under water. In the own research presented in the article, the results on the levels of anxiety as a trait and a state in divers taking part in hyperbaric exposures indicate the fact that the majority of the examined divers have low levels of anxiety both as a trait and a state, which most probably indicates the good psychological condition of the examined divers.

Open access
Vascular Complication in Aesthetic Medicine Treated with Hyperbaric Oxygenation

Abstract

The most hazardous adverse reactions following hyaluronic acid injections in aesthetic medicine involve vascular complications, known as the Nicolau Syndrome. This article presents a vascular complication in the area of the upper part of the nasolabial fold following subcutaneous administration of 0.5 ml of hyaluronic acid. At the time of the injection, paling occurred, which was followed by livedo racemosa appearing an hour later. Upon the lapse of a week, an ulceration appeared. It was not until the tenth day after the hyaluronic acid injection that hyaluronidase was administered. After 15 hyperbaric oxygen exposures, the ulcer was completely healed

Open access