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Dorota Kuncewicz

Conflict Resolution and Relational Patterns in the Families of Origin of Women and Men

The aim of the studies was to seek an answer to the following question: Which relationship patterns correlate with different conflict resolution strategies in women's and men's intimate relationships? The subjects were 56 engaged couples (aged 19-37) answering Conflict Resolution Strategy Questionnaires, Personal Authority in the Family System Questionnaires and The Family of Origin Scale. The network of correlations between conflict resolution strategies and relationship patterns is more complex for women than for men. In the women's group, the correlation connects constructive strategies (dialogue and loyalty) foremost with patterns defining intimacy (or its components). However, destructive strategies (exit and neglect) are related to patterns definitive of individuation levels in the family of origin, independence and position. In the men's group, however, the correlation connects conflict resolution strategies (constructive and destructive) to relationship patterns definitive of partner relations. Furthermore, constructive strategies are associated with lower intergeneration triangulation intensity and higher intergenerational intimidation intensity.

Open access

Małgorzata Pabiś and Dorota Kuncewicz

Abstract

Aim. The objective of the study was discussion of the important aspects of care for the elderly, to whom the standards of geriatric care do not apply.

Material and methods. In accordance with the designed goal, the analysis included selected literature concerning: the quality of health care standards for the elderly, complex model of geriatric care from the qualitative aspect, institutional care and psychological aspect of the seniors’ stage of life.

Results. Standards of care for the elderly differ from each other by the area they refer to and way and level of specificity of reports. The recommendations by the World Health Organization are very general, while the standards by the Polish team of geriatricians and gerontologists present very detailed recommendations. In turn, in the Charter for the Elderly, the authors draw attention to the fact that not only medical services influence the process of treatment of an elderly person, but also: economic, social, and family conditions in which he/she lives. Taking care for an elderly person by the family is an ideal solution. However, when this is not possible, this function is taken over by care institutions. The institutional care, as perceived by the elderly, should be a substitute of family life - this is a specific expression of the desire that the care for an elderly person should not be brought down to service, but should also consider the relational aspect of caring. Unfortunately, this aspect is relatively consequently omitted in standards. In relation to this absence, the relational aspect of care is handled more comprehensively in the presented article.

Open access

Małgorzata Pabiś and Dorota Kuncewicz

Abstract

Aim. The objective of the study was presentation of the needs of the elderly in the context of changes of these needs conditioned by the demographic processes. Analyses also covered the projected demographic changes and a wider context, e.g. social and cultural.

Material and methods. Statistical, demographic and medical data were analyzed by the methods of descriptive statistics with particular consideration of the population aged over 65. Analyses also covered the relevant literature concerning problems of the elderly. On account of the wide thematic range, the content was selected concerning seniors’ health needs and the development of their changes; subsequently, the effects of these changes were analyzed with particular emphasis on the population aged over 65.

Results. The development of changes concerning the Polish population aged over 65 within five analysed years (2011-2015) showed an upward tendency (by 14.12%). It is estimated that this tendency will continue within the next 35 years (2015-2050). In 2015, the percentage of the population aged over 65 was 15.81%, while in 2020 and 2050 it is projected to be 18.87% and 32.69% respectively. The ultimate demand for health care is affected not only by the demography and morbidity - related factors, but also by social and cultural ones. The lack of acceptance for the process of ageing, old age and death does not build space for culture, in which care of the elderly is a natural part of life. Increasingly more often, for various reasons, the family does not undertake care of an elderly person. The lack of consideration of these reasons, their complexity and therefore, the lack of attempts to change them, may result in an increased demand for an institutional care.

Open access

Dorota Kuncewicz, Ewa Sokołowska and Jolanta Sobkowicz

Abstract

The theory of literature provides tools for interpreting language communication. A psychologist, when interpreting a communication - which is often a latent one - has no other alternative but to employ these tools (with the exception of non-verbal communication). Often, however, this stage of work is defined as “intuitive”, which significantly limits the repeatability of the procedure and thus gives rise to reservations as to its scientific value. Review of certain literary theory devices, along with their possible applications, allows for naming these tools, selecting, and ordering the consecutive stages of communication analysis. In our opinion, such reviewing opens up the possibility for filling this gap in qualitative research analysis with specific tools and specific ways of using these tools in place of intuitiveness.

Open access

Dariusz Kuncewicz, Dorota Kuncewicz, Ewa Sokołowska and Jolanta Sobkowicz

Abstract

Our article describes and illustrates a procedure for isolating a hidden story from a monologue on an assigned topic. The procedure involves four stages: 1) collecting data and preparing transcripts; 2) identifying out-of-key elements; 3) analysing and interpreting a text by means of linguistic and literary theory devices; 4) formulating a hidden story. In deducing a hidden story from narratively out-of-key elements, the vital part was identifying the rules of speech and analysing the contexts in which they were used in the monologue. The hidden story was reconstructed as a one-level narrative pattern on the basis of information inferred from different contexts of using speech rules, as well as from information explicit in the monologue. Our article also discusses the theoretical and clinical value, and new trends in the research on hidden stories.