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  • Author: Dorina Geta Iușcă x
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Abstract

The accuracy of absolute pitch has often fallen into mythical perspectives, as this rare ability tends to fascinate people through its spectacular results. Many people tend to think that a musician with absolute pitch is always capable of identifying the musical note of any sound in any circumstances. The research literature has revealed that this is rarely true. Although there is a significant difference between real absolute pitch owners and pseudo-absolute pitch owners, the accuracy of absolute pitch is highly influenced by a series of musical factors such as: pitch chroma, pitch height and musical timbre. Therefore, it has been proven that the best absolute pitch accuracy manifests for medium pitch sounds, while very high or very low sounds tend to often be misidentified. Even more, absolute pitch owners tend to make an unusual mistake of misidentifying the octave. The familiar sounds (for example from the instrument the musician has studied in childhood) tend to produce less identification errors. Nevertheless, the piano timbre is usually associated with the best accuracy of absolute pitch. The aim of the present research is to synthetize up-to-date literature regarding the way these factors influence the accuracy of absolute pitch. The study focuses on the idea of normalizing the general perspective of absolute pitch accuracy, as musicians and teachers often tend to have very high expectations regarding this ability. The educational implications of the new perspective drawn here contribute to a better relation between teachers and students, as well as to a better understanding of this interesting musical ability.

Abstract

The criteria recommended for the performance of internal assessment are the ones included in the national model for school inspection applied by the inspectors in the school inspectorate or the Ministry of Education (with subsequent names) who carry out internal assessments. Educational establishments can also decide on certain additional criteria - in line with the specific needs. All educational establishments must perform the annual assessment of activity, regarding school development, educational programs, curricular and extracurricular activities, quality of the teaching-learning process, human resources development, relations with the community and European dimension in the education offered. A tricky problem is represented by the specific assessment of Children Centres and Clubs that carry out non-formal activity, without school programs and handbooks approved by the Ministry of Education. Carrying out an analysis of the manner of assessing formal and non-formal educational units, the need to readjust the internal and external assessment was identified. At the level of school inspectorates, school inspection is carried out by a team consisting of specialised inspectors who know the specificity of those educational units. The main problem is represented by the external assessment carried out by ARACIP with the help of standard specific means: fields, indicators, reference descriptors and specific descriptors. Through the study performed, a series of proposals on the beneficial amendments for the quality assessment within Children Centres and Clubs is identified.

Abstract

Open-earedness theory has repeatedly been confirmed on several populations including American, English, Dutch, German and Finnish people. Nonetheless the influence of cultural diversity on openness towards unfamiliar music has received little attention from researchers and this may create the possibility of adding essential modifications of Albert LeBlanc’s theory. Considering the contemporary context, people’s migration towards economic developed countries becomes a phenomenon with great implications related to the progress of social and cultural characteristics of any national context. Researching the openearedness of people which have been exposed not only to their native culture but also to the adopted one (due to financial necessities) may reveal a series of useful aspects for the intercultural field (by disclosing new ways to promote the tolerance towards cultural diversity) and also for the educational field (by describing new strategies of learning in a context of adaptation to an unfamiliar musical space). The present article analyses a series of previous experiments that monitored the way different social categories integrated in cultural communities different from their own assimilate or not the elements of the adopted country into their musical identity. The present analysis has educational implications related to the ways students may develop the preference for unfamiliar music.