Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for

  • Author: Dominika Skrzypek x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Dominika Skrzypek

The Formation of the Definite Article in the Nordic Languages

The definite article in Modern Nordic languages is a suffix, etymologically related to a demonstrative. The form is not attested in the oldest linguistic sources, the runic inscriptions, but appears first in Icelandic sagas and Swedish and Danish legal codices from 13th century onwards. In these texts it does not appear with the same regularity as in modern languages.

Despite numerous attempts to reconstruct the formation of the definite article in the Nordic languages, a number of questions remain either controversial or unanswered. The contention issues are the exact etymology of the article and the date of its formation.

The demonstrative from which the article grammaticalizes appears in Old Icelandic in two forms: inn or hinn, in Old Swedish as hinn only. However, only inn appears as a clitic. It is argued here that the etymology of inn and hinn may provide an argument in favour of an early formation of the article.

Open access

Dominika Skrzypek

Abstract

The article discusses possessive adjectives in Polish (derived from nouns and used to mark possession), their structure and functional scope as well as diachrony, and contrasts them with similar formations in Swedish. Adjectives derived from names and surnames are a marginal phenomenon in the Scandinavian languages and as such absent from most grammatical descriptions; their scope of use is limited. However, a comparison with Polish allows a new perspective on these adjectives in Polish as an alternative possessiva structure. The analysis is based on corpora search of Polish and Swedish texts.

Open access

Dominika Skrzypek

ABSTRACT

The present paper studies the earliest stages of the grammaticalization of indefinite article in Old Swedish. The study is based on a corpus of Old Swedish texts and uses the model of grammaticalization as proposed by Heine 1997. The article en, etymologically related to the numeral ‘one’, is first used to mark new and salient discourse-referents and its primary function is cataphoric. However, en only fulfills this function when ocurring in a sentenceinitial subject NP. In the course of the grammaticalization, neither the sentence-initial position nor the subject function of the NP are required to present new and salient discourse referents.

Open access

Alicja Piotrowska and Dominika Skrzypek

Abstract

In this paper we discuss the alienability splits in two Mainland Scandinavian languages, Swedish and Danish, in a diachronic context. Although it is not universally acknowledged that such splits exist in modern Scandinavian languages, many nouns typically included in inalienable structures such as kinship terms, body part nouns and nouns describing culturally important items show different behaviour from those considered alienable. The differences involve the use of (reflexive) possessive pronouns vs. the definite article, which differentiates the Scandinavian languages from e.g. English. As the definite article is a relatively new arrival in the Scandinavian languages, we look at when the modern pattern could have evolved by a close examination of possessive structures with potential inalienables in Old Swedish and Old Danish. Our results reveal that to begin with, inalienables are usually bare nouns and come to be marked with the definite article in the course of its grammaticalization.