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Daniela Cana-Ruiu, Eugen Mota, Eliza Trican, Natalia Istrate, Monica Popescu, Roxana Vasile, Cristina Văduva, Iulia Vladu and Lucian Stoica

Abstract

Cardiac failure (CHF), renal disease and anemia are interconnected in the Cardio- Renal Anemia syndrome. Diabetes mellitus remains the most common cause of endstage renal disease (ESRD) in the developed world and when it is associated with these three conditions it worsens the outcomes of these patients. Aim:to evaluate renal anemia and cardiac dysfunction in patients with chronic kidney disease with and without diabetes mellitus (DM). Materials and methods - we assessed 100 patients (40 women and 60 men), 41 patients with DM and 59 patients without DM. All patients had Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) - estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) under 60 ml/min/1,73 mp. We considered anemia when the value of haemoglobin (Hb) was under 11 g/dl. Results - Mean age of the studied patients was 60.38±11.79 years old in women and 59.28±13.89 years old in men. The prevalence of anemia was high in diabetic and non-diabetic patients, too. Anemia was more severe in patients with cardiac dysfunction than in those with normal cardiac function. The higher prevalence of cardiac dysfunction was in patients which had both anemia and DM. There were no significant differences about prevalence of diastolic or systolic cardiac dysfunction in non-diabetic versus diabetic patients. Conclusions - Anemia was an independent predictor for the development of cardiac dysfunction in patients with CKD and the prevalence of cardiac dysfunction was higher in patients who had both anemia and DM than in those without anemia and DM.

Open access

Iulia-Daniela Vladu, Daniela Cana, Cristina Vaduva, Corina Grauntanu, Sorin Zaharie, Raluca Dina, Ciprian Dina, Roxana Mustafa and Eugen Mota

Chronic Kidney Disease-Mineral Bone Disorder in Diabetes Mellitus Patients

Diabetes mellitus (DM) and chronic kidney disease (CKD) are two diseases with increasing prevalence and adverse outcomes that represent an international health problem. Chronic kidney disease- mineral and bone disorder (CKD-MBD) is defined as a systemic disorder of mineral and bone metabolism due to CKD manifested by either one or a combination of the following: abnormalities of calcium, phosphorus, PTH, or vitamin D metabolism; abnormalities in bone turnover, mineralization, volume, linear growth, or strength and vascular or other soft-tissue calcification. Disturbances in mineral and bone metabolism are prevalent in CKD and are an important cause of decreased quality of life, cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; these disturbances settle in earlier and have a more severe evolution in DM patients.

Open access

Fabián Rosas, Rodrigo Ramírez-Campillo, Cristian Martínez, Alexis Caniuqueo, Rodrigo Cañas-Jamet, Emma McCrudden, Cesar Meylan, Jason Moran, Fábio Y. Nakamura, Lucas A. Pereira, Irineu Loturco, Daniela Diaz and Mikel Izquierdo

Abstract

Plyometric training and beta-alanine supplementation are common among soccer players, although its combined use had never been tested. Therefore, a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted to compare the effects of a plyometric training program, with or without beta-alanine supplementation, on maximal-intensity and endurance performance in female soccer players during an in-season training period. Athletes (23.7 ± 2.4 years) were assigned to either a plyometric training group receiving a placebo (PLACEBO, n = 8), a plyometric training group receiving beta-alanine supplementation (BA, n = 8), or a control group receiving placebo without following a plyometric training program (CONTROL, n = 9). Athletes were evaluated for single and repeated jumps and sprints, endurance, and change-of-direction speed performance before and after the intervention. Both plyometric training groups improved in explosive jumping (ES = 0.27 to 1.0), sprinting (ES = 0.31 to 0.78), repeated sprinting (ES = 0.39 to 0.91), 60 s repeated jumping (ES = 0.32 to 0.45), endurance (ES = 0.35 to 0.37), and change-of-direction speed performance (ES = 0.36 to 0.58), whereas no significant changes were observed for the CONTROL group. Nevertheless, compared to the CONTROL group, only the BA group showed greater improvements in endurance, repeated sprinting and repeated jumping performances. It was concluded that beta-alanine supplementation during plyometric training may add further adaptive changes related to endurance, repeated sprinting and jumping ability.