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Open access

Daniel Demmler, Peter Rindal, Mike Rosulek and Ni Trieu

Abstract

An important initialization step in many social-networking applications is contact discovery, which allows a user of the service to identify which of its existing social contacts also use the service. Naïve approaches to contact discovery reveal a user’s entire set of social/professional contacts to the service, presenting a significant tension between functionality and privacy. In this work, we present a system for private contact discovery, in which the client learns only the intersection of its own contact list and a server’s user database, and the server learns only the (approximate) size of the client’s list. The protocol is specifically tailored to the case of a small client set and large user database. Our protocol has provable security guarantees and combines new ideas with state-of-the-art techniques from private information retrieval and private set intersection.

We report on a highly optimized prototype implementation of our system, which is practical on real-world set sizes. For example, contact discovery between a client with 1024 contacts and a server with 67 million user entries takes 1.36 sec (when using server multi-threading) and uses only 4.28 MiB of communication.

Open access

Gilad Asharov, Daniel Demmler, Michael Schapira, Thomas Schneider, Gil Segev, Scott Shenker and Michael Zohner

Abstract

The Border Gateway Protocol (BGP) computes routes between the organizational networks that make up today’s Internet. Unfortunately, BGP suffers from deficiencies, including slow convergence, security problems, a lack of innovation, and the leakage of sensitive information about domains’ routing preferences. To overcome some of these problems, we revisit the idea of centralizing and using secure multi-party computation (MPC) for interdomain routing which was proposed by Gupta et al. (ACM HotNets’12). We implement two algorithms for interdomain routing with state-of-the-art MPC protocols. On an empirically derived dataset that approximates the topology of today’s Internet (55 809 nodes), our protocols take as little as 6 s of topology-independent precomputation and only 3 s of online time. We show, moreover, that when our MPC approach is applied at country/region-level scale, runtimes can be as low as 0.17 s online time and 0.20 s pre-computation time. Our results motivate the MPC approach for interdomain routing and furthermore demonstrate that current MPC techniques are capable of efficiently tackling real-world problems at a large scale.