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Gabriela Mut-Vitcu, Iuliana-Claudia Hudrea, Svetlana Moşteoru, Laura Gaiţă and Dan Gaiţă

Abstract

Background and Aims: Recent studies have brought evidence on the connection between excess weight and suboptimal glycemic control for Diabetes Mellitus (DM) patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between increased Body Mass Index (BMI) and the likelihood of having suboptimal glycemic control in patients with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Materials and Methods: A case-control study was conducted on 662 patients suffering from Diabetes Mellitus and statistical analysis was performed in order obtain evidence associating BMI and poor glycaemic control. We defined as increased BMI, values >25 kg/m2 and a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) value >7% reflected suboptimal glycemic control. Results: 559 (84%) patients had HbA1c >7%. 550 (83 %) patients had a BMI >25 kg/m2. In case of HbA1c >7%, a BMI >25 kg/m2 was found in a number of 457 patients (82 %), whereas a normal BMI was present in 102 (18%) patients. For the HbA1c<7% cases, the number of patients associating BMI >25 kg/m2 was 93 (90%) and a normal BMI was present in 10 (10%) patients. BMI >25 kg/m2 was not associated with a higher probability of having above-target HbA1c values compared to patients with target HbA1c (OR 0.48, 95% CI: 0.24 to 0.95), with a statistically significant p <0.05. Conclusions: The findings revealed that although in case of suboptimal glycemic control, the number of patients who had a BMI >25 kg/m2 was significantly higher than the number of patients with a BMI < 25 kg/m2, a BMI above target was not associated with greater odds of having HbA1c higher than the standard 7% level, compared to individuals with normal HbA1c levels. The results emphasize that a multitude of factors are involved in the process of achieving a targeted glycemic control and a stepped-care approach should be considered for optimum management of Diabetes Mellitus.

Open access

Dan Gaiţă, Mihaela Oraviţan and Claudiu Avram

Abstract

Among the factors acting as a burden to health, physical inactivity ranks fourth as a risk factor for all-cause mortality and sixth among the risk factor for loss of disability in adjusted life years. Unhealthy diets and physical inactivity are key risk factors for the major noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer and diabetes. It were investigated a sample of 1106 Romanian subjects, aged 18 and over. 53% of the questioned population is informed regarding the benefits of daily physical activities, but only 35% of Romanians declare that they find it easy to apply what they know about maintaining health. Their main sources of information are: television (56%) and Internet (17%). 49% perform appropriate physical activity; walking (51%) and household activities (32%) are the main physical activities performed by Romanians, while sports are performed by few of those interviewed (running – 12%, fitness – 7%, cycling – 6%, football – 6%, gymnastics – 4%, while all the other did not score over 2%). Half of respondents practice physical activities rarely or not at all, and the main reasons for the sedentary behaviour are the lack of time (42%), lack of money (16%) or convenience (15%). Nearly half of Romanians are sedentary. Although the level of information regarding the benefits of physical activities is satisfactory, the degree of putting this information into practice is very small; the population is not sufficiently aware of the necessity to perform physical activities, in spite of the fact that the effects of a sedentary lifestyle are evident.