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E.-H. Lee, K.-M. Kim, W.-Y. Maeng and D.-H. Hur

Abstract

After preparing aqueous suspensions from magnetite particles with a poly-acrylic acid, we investigated the effects of several experimental parameters. We characterized the stability of the suspensions using visual inspection, sedimentation, adsorption, and thermal stability of the dispersant. The dispersion stability is affected by the solution pH, the concentrations of magnetite particles, the molecular weight, the concentration of the dispersants, and the temperature. The stability of the suspensions increased as the concentration of the dispersant and the temperature increased. In terms of the molecular weights of the dispersant, the suspensions with dispersant of low-molecular weight (1800) were more stable than those of high-molecular weight (250000) at room temperature. However, at high temperature the suspensions with high-molecular weight showed stability. The adsorption efficiency of the dispersant was very low. The dispersant of high-molecular weight showed a higher thermal integrity than that of low-molecular weight. From this work, we obtained the optimum conditions for stable aqueous suspensions of magnetite particles.

Open access

B. Ali, S.H. Choi, S.J. Seo, D.Y. Maeng, C.G. Lee, T.S. Kim and K.T. Park

Abstract

The water atomization of iron powder with a composition of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo (wt.%) at 1600°C and 150 bar creates an oxide layer, which in this study was reduced using a mixture of methane (CH4) and argon (Ar) gas. The lowest oxygen content was achieved with a 100 cc/min flow rate of CH4, but this also resulted in a co-deposition of carbon due to the cracking of CH4. This carbon can be used directly to create high-quality, sinter hardenable steel, thereby eliminating the need for an additional mixing step prior to sintering. An exponential relationship was found to exist between the CH4 gas flow rate and carbon content of the powder, meaning that its composition can be easily controlled to suit a variety of different applications.