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  • Author: Csaba Vadász x
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The Effect of Above-Ground Medium Voltage Power Lines on Displaying Site Selection of the Great Bustard (Otis Tarda) in Central Hungary

Abstract

Our study was conducted in the Upper-Kiskunság region, Central Hungary, which hosts the largest Pannonian population of the Great Bustard (Otis tarda). The influence of the presence of aboveground medium voltage power lines on displaying site selection of Great Bustard males was investigated. The results revealed that displaying males totally reject the sites located within 350-400 m or closer to medium voltage power lines as displaying sites and show relative rejection towards potential displaying sites located at a distance between 500 and 1000 m far from power lines. Surprisingly, the overall negative effects influence much larger part of the potential displaying grounds, up to the distance to 3500 m from power lines. It can be declared that power lines reduce the extent of suitable displaying sites of the Great Bustards in the Upper-Kiskunság region. Accordingly, installation of new above-ground power lines (and other kind of wires, such as high voltage power lines, optical cables etc.) would further reduce the extent of suitable displaying sites.

Open access
Key Mortality Causes of the Great Bustard (Otis Tarda) in Central Hungary: An Analysis of Known Fatalities

Abstract

In this study, we identified the key mortality causes of eggs, juveniles and adults of the Great Bustard (Otis tarda) and quantified the relative importance of those, based on systematic data collection that have been carried out during the period between 2005 and 2014 at the Upper-Kiskunság region in Central Hungary. Rate of mortality regarding juveniles and adults was 39.71% caused by anthropogenic factors. Within the anthropogenic factors leading to mortality, collision was represented by 81.48% of fatalities, whereas mowing/hay making represented by 18.52%. Hay making/mowing was the factor leading to unsuccessful breeding attempt with the strongest negative effect on the breeding success of the investigated population of the Great Bustard, as it was represented by 50.96% of all known mortality cases. Chemical treatment had the factor with the second strongest effect, as it was represented by 12.33% of all known mortality cases. The rate of unsuccessful breeding (hatching) caused by particular activities (hay making/mowing, tillage, harvesting) varied between 68.42% and 75.00%. It was the disturbance by passers-by which led to the highest portion of unsuccessful breeding with 83.33% unsuccessful nests.

Open access
Demographic data on the Little Owl (Athene noctua) in Upper-Kiskunság (Hungary)

Abstract

This study focused on the clutch size and age-specific apparent survival rate of the Little Owl (Athene noctua) population in Upper-Kiskunság, Hungary. Between May 2005 and April 2017, 640 individuals were captured and ringed in a total of 746 capture-recapture occasions. Artificial nest boxes were installed in the study area, breeding birds and pulli were captured for ringing/recaptured in these boxes (from March to May), or at the close neighbourhood of those (max. 168 m). Jolly-Seber’s open population method was applied to model the survival rate. The candidate model set included models incorporating age, year-effect, and the combination of those. AICc value was used to compare models in a selection approach. The final model was constructed via model averaging based on the models with significant explanatory power. The average number and SD of pullus/breeding pair was 3.78 ± 0.76. The average apparent annual survival rate (which does not differentiate between mortality and permanent emigration) for the period between pullus stage and the time of the first breeding was estimated as 9.47% ± 2.99% SE, whereas the annual survival rate of adults was 82.74% ± 8.46% SE. The effect of sex on the survival rate of adults was not investigated due to female-biased sample, as the probability of capturing females is significantly higher in late spring months. Our experience reveals that during February and March it is possible to capture both sexes in the nest boxes, and it does not influence negatively the breeding success. Based on our results, the population of the Little Owl is stable in Upper-Kiskunság. A slight increase in estimated population size is observable even if we make no difference between mortality and permanent emigration. The high occupancy rate of the installed nest boxes reveals that nest site availability is an important limiting factor in the studied population.

Open access