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Andreea Barcan, Dorin Tarta and Cristina Tarta

Abstract

Pulmonary embolism (PE) is one of the most severe conditions encountered in the emergency department (ED) and one of the leading causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in patients presenting with hemodynamic instability, right ventricular dysfunction, or necessitating cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The early recognition and treatment of PE is essential, as many studies demonstrated that mortality rates drop significantly if adequate therapy is administered from the early stages. The aim of this update is to summarize the various patterns of PE presentations in the ED.

Open access

DI Tarta, Căldăraru Carmen Denise, Tarta Cristina, A Frigy, E Caraşca, Carlan Otilia and AG Dogaru

Abstract

How reliable is office assessed blood pressure (BP) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and kidney transplant (KTx) recipients is yet to be determined, although the diagnosis of arterial hypertension has been based on these measurements. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential differences between office assessed BP and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring (ABPM) in CKD patients and KTx recipients. We conducted a prospective study which enrolled 45 patients. Morning and evening seated office BPs were assessed using a sphygmomanometer at 5 consecutive outpatient visits. A mean systolic BP (SBP) and diastolic BP (DBP) was calculated. Ambulatory blood pressure was measured over 24 hours using a Meditech ABPM-05 device. Office SBP was statistically significant higher in CKD patients than KTx recipients both in the morning and evening (p=0.0433 and p=0.0066 respectively). ABPM showed higher night-time SBPs (p=0.0445) and higher overall, day-time and night-time DBPs in KTX recipients (p=0.0001, p=0.0006, p<0.0001 respectively). In CKD patients, office SBPs and DBPs are significantly higher than overall SBPs and DBPs as assessed by 24hr ABPM. Office BP monitoring as assessed by clinician is acceptable but tends to overestimate BP in both CKD and KTx study groups.

Open access

Carmen Denise Căldăraru, Dorin Ionuţ Tarta, Mirela Liana Gliga, Cristina Tarta, Emilian Caraşca, Sorin Albu, Adina Huţanu, Maria Dogaru and Grigore Dogaru

Abstract

Introduction: Hepcidin is a regulatory protein in iron metabolism; we do not know the role in chronic kidney disease anemia. Methods: 22 patients with CKD anemia and 15 patients with CKD without anemia were investigated. CKD anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, hemoglobin ≤12 g/dl for women and ≤13 g/dl for men, no treatment for anemia 6 months before enrollment, glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <60 ml/min/1.73m2 and stable creatinine three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: infection, bleeding, malignancy, systemic or liver disease, immunosuppression, renal replacement therapy. CKD without anemia-inclusion criteria: over 18 years, no anemia or treatment for anemia, CKD with stable creatinine values three months before enrollment. Exclusion criteria: medical conditions known to have a role in the development of polycythemia. Hepcidin-25 and ferritin were measured by ELISA method. Erythropoietin (EPO), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 were evaluated using chemiluminescent enzyme immunometric assays. Unpaired T test, Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used for statistical analysis. Results: Hemoglobin values were significantly lower in anemia group. There were no differences in terms of eGFR, age, body mass index, serum hepcidin, erythropoietin, fibrinogen, IL-6, and TNF-α between CKD patients with and without anemia. Serum hepcidin correlated positively with ferritin (r=0.45 p<0.05), TNF-α (r=0.54, p<0.05) and negatively with erythropoietin (r=-0.51, p<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that TNF-α is an independent predictor of serum hepcidin in our patients (p=0.003, R=0.71). Conclusion: We found no differences in serum hepcidin, erythropoietin and inflammatory markers in non-dialysis CKD patients with and without anemia.