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  • Author: Claudiu Manea x
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Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma – literature review and case series

Abstract

Juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma is a rare benign tumour of vascular origin found in adolescent males, originating around the sphenopalatine foramen. Although the exact pathogenesis of the tumour is not yet known, natural history and growth patterns can be predicted. JNA progressively involves the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, pterygopalatine fossa, infratemporal fossa and, in severe cases, an orbital or intracranial extension can be seen. Early diagnosis based on clinical examination and imaging is mandatory to ensure the best resectability of the tumour, as small to moderate tumours can be managed exclusively endoscopically. Preoperative angiography can reveal the vascular sources and allow embolization to prevent significant bleeding. We present a brief literature review followed by our case series of endoscopic removal of 7 juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibromas.

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Cystic fibrosis - general review on sinonasal complications and case report

Abstract

An irreversible disease, cystic fibrosis (CF), is responsible for affecting multiple organ systems containing epithelia. It is well known that the sinonasal disease caused by CF has consequences for the incidence of the lower airway exacerbations, as well as affecting the quality of life of those patients. This review provides an update by evaluating the available literature regarding pathogenesis, management and treatment of cystic fibrosis patients. To gain a better view of the disease and obtain a higher life expectancy, further studies are needed.

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Crista galli sinusitis – a radiological impression or a real clinical entity

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Crista galli is an anatomical structure localized in the midline, that derives from the ethmoid bone, with a compact bone structure, sometimes pneumatized. The connection between the pneumatized crista galli and the adjacent paranasal structures is usually performed through an opening similar with a sinusal ostium.

MATERIAL AND METHODS. We performed a retrospective clinical study about the incidence of the pneumatization of crista galli in 196 patients with chronic sinusitis. We evaluated the degree of pneumatization and the drainage pathways of crista galli, trying to correlate the radiological findings with the symptomatology of the patients with crista galli “sinusitis”.

RESULTS. Pneumatization of crista galli was found in 30.1% of cases. From 59 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and pneumatized crista galli, 66.4% had no opacification, 23.7% various degrees of opacification and 11.9% showed complete opacification. The presence of an opening of the pneumatized crista galli into surrounding air-cells was found in 16.98% of the patients. Headache was encountered in 76.2% of the patients with CRS and pneumatized crista galli sinusitis.

CONCLUSION. When analyzing a CT scan of a patient with CRS, we should also take into consideration the pneumatization of crista galli, which has a high variability. Most of the patients included in our study had also a certain degree of opacification of the pneumatized crista galli. Headache had a higher incidence in patients with crista galli inflammation than in CRS patients who showed no pneumatization or opacification of the crista galli (76.2% versus 60.5% in “simple” CRS patients).

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Weight loss therapy for obstructive sleep apnea – Literature review

Abstract

Obstructive sleep apnea is a chronic disease characterized by the appearance of apnea or hypopnea episodes during sleep. This condition is associated with several risk factors. Among them, the most important is obesity and it is the only potentially curable. The treatment is polimodal and it involves several therapeutic directions. The purpose of this paper is to establish the role of obesity in the etiology of sleep apnea, as well as the role of the weight loss in its management, both through intensive lifestyle interventions and surgical therapy.

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Abducens nerve palsy on a patient with sphenoid fungal rhinosinusitis and cavernous sinus meningioma – Case report

Abstract

We report a case of a 47-year-old patient recently diagnosed with left abducens nerve palsy, who was admitted in our clinic with diplopia. The cranio-facial CT scan revealed left sphenoid fungal rhinosinusitis and the patient underwent endoscopic surgery with complete removal of the fungal material. The immediate postoperative evolution of the patient was favourable, with partial improvement of diplopia. The first month follow-up visit revealed the recurrence of the diplopia, so the patient performed an MRI scan of the brain that showed a cavernous sinus meningioma. The patient was referred to a neurosurgeon who choose a “wait-and-see” strategy instead of surgery.

The paper presents the limits of computed tomography versus magnetic resonance imaging in the radiologic diagnosis of intracranial tumors.

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Difficulties in the surgical management of head and neck cancer patient

Abstract

Malignancies of the upper aerodigestive tract are high morbidity bearing and life-threatening diseases, which require thorough care from diagnostic suspicion and confirmation to surgical and/or oncologic treatment and rehabilitation. Difficulties in managing head and neck cancers arise from delays in diagnosis and treatment caused by either patient-related factors or healthcare system-related factors. Tumor origin and stage determine whether surgical excision is feasible, the approach required for safe excision, the extent of functional and aesthetic sacrifice required to attain oncologic safety and the need for reconstructive surgery. A thorough and systematic preoperative risk versus benefits assessment to select potential surgical candidates and give realistic outcomes is important from both a medical and a legal point of view. Because tumors in the head and neck region frequently involve more than one system and sensory organ, potential loss of function from either the disease course, surgical or nonsurgical treatment should be taken into account form a quality of life perspective. Effective management of head and neck cancer patients requires the cooperation and combined effort of a multidisciplinary team of surgeons, physicians and other workers over a long period of time which, in the absence of a specialised head and neck cancer centre and guidelines, can lead to increased morbidity and mortality, and patient dissatisfaction.

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Current insights in CSF leaks: a literature review of mechanisms, pathophysiology and treatment options

Abstract

A cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak occurs when there appears a fistula between the dura and the skull base and it is usually characterized by discharge of cerebrospinal fluid from the nose. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks may have many etiologies, the most common being trauma. The most common site of dural lesion is the cribriform plate of the ethmoid. Diagnosis can be achieved by a multitude of techniques, high-resolution computed tomography being the modality of choice and it may be completed with magnetic resonance imaging or cisternography. Treatment may be either conservative, either surgical, related to the cause, the site and the duration of CSF leak. Conservative treatment usually includes strict bed rest, elevated bed head and no straining, nose blowing or stretching, with resolution of the majority of traumatic CSF leaks in seven days. Surgical treatment consists of a variety of approaches (intracranial/extracranial, open/endoscopic). The future trend is represented by minimally invasive endoscopic approaches, with a success rate of almost 90%; however, open transcranial or extracranial interventions still have indications in the surgical management. CSF leaks must be correctly diagnosed and treated, because the risk of intracranial complications increases 10-fold when the leakage persists.

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The role of olfactory ensheating cells in regenerative medicine: review of the literature

Abstract

Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) join olfactory axons in their entrance to the central nervous system, representing a unique population of glial cells with functions in olfactory neurogenesis, axonal growth and olfactory bulb formation. Olfactory ensheathing cells have a great potential to induce repair for neural injuries, in central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, existing numerous experimental and clinical studies lately, reporting beneficial effects in anatomical and functional recovery. Studies are also conducted in order to establish possible pro-regenerative effects of the OECs, their potential in tissue repair and ability to modulate the immune system. The aim of this paper was to review the properties of olfactory ensheathing cells and their potential therapeutic role in regenerative medicine.

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Signal void and pseudo-pneumatized sinus in fungal rhinosinusitis – Case report

Abstract

BACKGROUND. Signal void, or the absence of signal on MRI sequences, in the sinonasal region may be encountered in fungal rhinosinusitis cases with the aspect of a pseudo-pneumatized sinus, leading to diagnostic errors.

CASE REPORT. We present the case of a 75-year-old woman referred to our clinic for complete and persistent right-sided nasal obstruction. The patient was evaluated using sinus CT and contrast-enhanced head MRI. Opacification of the right maxillary, ethmoid and frontal sinuses as well as of the right nasal fossa were seen on CT, with maxillary sinus expansion and osseous erosion. The MRI showed T2 signal void in the maxillary sinus with extension to the nasal fossa, creating the appearance of a pseudo-pneumatized sinus, and hyperintense signal in the ipsilateral anterior ethmoid and frontal sinuses. The patient underwent endoscopic sinus surgery. The dual imaging evaluation of the patient aided the preoperative differential diagnosis and choosing the surgical approach.

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Difficulties in the diagnosis of fungal rhinosinusitis – Literature review

Abstract

Fungal rhinosinusitis is an important pathological entity, a highly controversial topic in the medical world today, by the various research directions it offers. In order to be able to predict a patient’s prognosis and his response to treatment, first we must have a classification of fungal rhinosinusitis. The authors considered it is important to make a distinction between invasive and noninvasive forms of fungal rhinosinusitis. The most important step in the management of fungal rhinosinusitis is to have a correct diagnosis, based on strong criteria, which will lead to a better prognosis of this disease. Because of its invasiveness potential, especially in patients at risk, it is essential to have a correct and fast diagnosis in case of fungal rhinosinusitis, in order to begin the treatment as fast as possible, for a favourable prognosis. The only way to establish diagnosis in a reliable way is to make a detailed clinical examination and to take biopsy samples.

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