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  • Author: Christian Federmann x
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Appraise: an Open-Source Toolkit for Manual Evaluation of MT Output

Appraise: an Open-Source Toolkit for Manual Evaluation of MT Output

We describe Appraise, an open-source toolkit supporting manual evaluation of machine translation output. The system allows to collect human judgments on translation output, implementing annotation tasks such as 1) quality checking, 2) translation ranking, 3) error classification, and 4) manual post-editing. It features an extensible, XML-based format for import/export and can easily be adapted to new annotation tasks. The current version of Appraise also includes automatic computation of inter-annotator agreements allowing quick access to evaluation results. Appraise is actively developed and used in several MT projects.

Open access
MT Server Land: An Open-Source MT Architecure

MT Server Land: An Open-Source MT Architecure

We describe the implementation of MT Server Land, an open-source architecture for machine translation that is developed by the MT group at DFKI. A broker server collects and distributes translation requests to several worker servers that create the actual translations. Users can access the system via a fast and easy-to-use web interface or use an XML-RPC-based API interface to integrate it into their applications. The source code is published under a BSD-style license and is freely available from GitHub1.

Open access
Towards Optimal Choice Selection for Improved Hybrid Machine Translation

Towards Optimal Choice Selection for Improved Hybrid Machine Translation

In recent years, machine translation (MT) research focused on investigating how hybrid MT as well as MT combination systems can be designed so that the resulting translations give an improvement over the individual translations.

As a first step towards achieving this objective we have developed a parallel corpus with source data and the output of a number of MT systems, annotated with metadata information, capturing aspects of the translation process performed by the different MT systems.

As a second step, we have organised a shared task in which participants were requested to build Hybrid/System Combination systems using the annotated corpus as input. The main focus of the shared task is trying to answer the following question: Can Hybrid MT algorithms or System Combination techniques benefit from the extra information (linguistically motivated, decoding and runtime) from the different systems involved?

In this paper, we describe the annotated corpus we have created. We provide an overview on the participating systems from the shared task as well as a discussion of the results.

Open access