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  • Author: Boróka Prohászka-Rád x
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Abstract

Analyzing Stevens’s 1952 The Poem that Took the Place of a Mountain I trace the laborious journey the persona of the poem undertakes - an external as well as an internal adventure - transforming thus the world into a possible home. I show how the poem - through its self-reflexive nature and complex system of interwoven external and internal images and circular movements - may offer the persona a sense of self and home in space and time among the fragments of the broken universe.

Abstract

“Hello, there! My name is OTTO. [...] I want to make trouble because I want to make things even more complicated than they are around here, and then maybe I can get out of this whole mess – this family and everything. Let’s see: my name is OTTO. I have an identical twin brother. I’m trying to get rid of him, rid of all of them – but it’s not easy: you know how twins are; well, maybe you don’t” – OTTO, one of the identical twin brothers (both named Otto) of Edward Albee’s Me, Myself and I opens the play addressing the audience. Albee’s wit and sharp irony dominate the play, managing to “engage, to upset, to trouble” audiences and readers. In my paper I analyze the methods Albee employs in transforming the stage into a meta- and intertextual “space” subverting and undermining any belief in identity and language as fixed, stable and functional “entities.”

Abstract

In the present study we propose a look at Zsolna Ugron’s works from a generic perspective in order to analyze what conventions of genres such as the romance, the epistolary novel and the historical romance the author has revived and what are the elements that she has added or changed in order to make them appealing to the public and yield to critical analysis. We also attempt an investigation of the formation of female subjectivity as illustrated by these fundamentally feminine novels, given that all four of them operate with female protagonists, women in the process of shaping their destinies, often at crossroads where - despite all the external factors that seem to determine their fate from history to social conventions and men around them - ultimately they make their own personal choices and position themselves as responsible, active and creative subjects.

Abstract

There are countless ways of crossing borders, be they physical, geographic, social, economic, cultural or psychological. When coming up against a border, one has two options: either to cross it or to remain within. This essay investigates Csaba Székely’s Bányavidék [Mine District] trilogy primarily from the perspective of such concepts of imagology as region, center-periphery dichotomy, identity, image, representation, as well as stereotypes and clichés, and examines whether the playwright truly deconstructs such stereotyped representations of the specific geographical and cultural space and its people the trilogy focuses on.