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  • Author: Barbara Faganel Kotnik x
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Association between SLC19A1 gene polymorphism and high dose methotrexate toxicity in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and non Hodgkin malignant lymphoma: introducing a haplotype based approach

Abstract

Background

We investigated the clinical relevance of SLC 19A1 genetic variability for high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) related toxicities in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) and non Hodgkin malignant lymphoma (NHML).

Patients and methods

Eighty-eight children and adolescents with ALL/NHML were investigated for the influence of SLC 19A1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes on HD-MTX induced toxicities.

Results

Patients with rs2838958 TT genotype had higher probability for mucositis development as compared to carriers of at least one rs2838958 C allele (OR 0.226 (0.071–0.725), p < 0.009). Haplotype TGTTCCG (H4) statistically significantly reduced the risk for the occurrence of adverse events during treatment with HD-MTX (OR 0.143 (0.023–0.852), p = 0.030).

Conclusions

SLC 19A1 SNP and haplotype analysis could provide additional information in a personalized HD-MTX therapy for children with ALL/NHML in order to achieve better treatment outcome. However further studies are needed to validate the results.

Open access
The influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexaterelated toxicity and survival in children with non-Hodgkin malignant lymphoma

Abstract

Background. We evaluated the influence of folate pathway polymorphisms on high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) related toxicity in paediatric patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Patients and methods. In total, 30 NHL patients were genotyped for selected folate pathway polymorphisms.

Results. Carriers of at least one MTHFR 677T allele had significantly higher MTX area under the time-concentration curve levels at third MTX cycle (P = 0.003). These patients were also at higher odds of leucopoenia (P = 0.006) or thrombocytopenia (P = 0.041) and had higher number of different HD-MTX-related toxicity (P = 0.035) compared to patients with wild-type genotype.

Conclusions. Our results suggest an important role of MTHFR 677C>T polymorphism in the development of HD-MTXrelated toxicity in children with NHL.

Open access
Diagnostic accuracy of haemophilia early arthropathy detection with ultrasound (HEAD-US): a comparative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study

Abstract

Background

Repeated haemarthroses affect approximately 90% of patients with severe haemophilia and lead to progressive arthropathy, which is the main cause of morbidity in these patients. Diagnostic imaging can detect even subclinical arthropathy changes and may impact prophylactic treatment. Magnetic resonance imagining (MRI) is generally the gold standard tool for precise evaluation of joints, but it is not easily feasible in regular follow-up of patients with haemophilia. The development of the standardized ultrasound (US) protocol for detection of early changes in haemophilic arthropathy (HEAD-US) opened new perspectives in the use of US in management of these patients. The HEAD-US protocol enables quick evaluation of the six mostly affected joints in a single study. The aim of this prospective study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the HEAD-US protocol for the detection and quantification of haemophilic arthropathy in comparison to the MRI.

Patients and methods

The study included 30 patients with severe haemophilia. We evaluated their elbows, ankles and knees (overall 168 joints) by US using the HEAD-US protocol and compared the results with the MRI using the International Prophylaxis Study Group (IPSG) MRI score.

Results

The results showed that the overall HEAD-US score correlated very highly with the overall IPSG MRI score (r = 0.92). Correlation was very high for the evaluation of the elbows and knees (r ≈ 0.95), and slightly lower for the ankles (r ≈ 0.85).

Conclusions

HEAD-US protocol proved to be a quick, reliable and accurate method for the detection and quantification of haemophilic arthropathy.

Open access