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  • Author: B.P. Solanki x
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Seed Yield Increase in Niger Crop in to Relation to Honeybee and Other Pollinators

Abstract

Niger (Guizotia abyssinica Cass) is an important minor oilseed crop of hilly and tribal regions and it is used for oil as well as for various other purposes only by the tribal people. Therefore, a systematic study was arranged to document about the increase in the seed yield of niger crop in relation to honeybees (Aphis mellifera), as a pollinator in niger crop with paired plot technique at the Niger Research Station (NRS) at Navsari Agricultural University (NAU) and at farmer’s field, Vanarasi, Navsari, Gujarat (India) and also studied its relation in terms of cost benefit ratio (CB). The trial was conducted at Niger Research Station (NRS), Vanarasi for 3 years (2013-14, 2014-15 and 2015-16) and also at farmer's field to ascertain the role and involvement of honey bees (Aphis mellifera) in swelling the seed yield of niger crop (due to pollination) and its effect on income due to increase in the niger seed yield. Significant differences were observed for number of capitula/plant, number of seeds/capitula, 1000 seed weight and seed yield in both the location for the consecutive 3 years. However, the seed yield and gross returns were considerably higher in first location of T1 Natural plot/open pollinated with beehive (Aphis mellifera) in all the 3 years data with the maximum seed yield with the gross return was obtained in this treatment.

Open access
Relationship of Bacterial Leaf Blight Disease of Cotton with Different Weather Parameters Under South Gujarat Condition of India

Abstract

Cotton is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium in the family Malvaceae. Bacterial blight of cotton, also know as angular leaf spot, boll rot, and black leg, is a potentially destructive bacterial disease of cotton production. The disease caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith) Dye (synonyms Xanthomonas malvacearum (E.F. Sm) Dowson) is one of the most important and serious disease in cotton crop. Main objective of present research is to study the progress of the bacterial blight disease of cotton (BLB), caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. malvacearum (Smith) Dye, with relation to the environmental parameters. This is a common disease affecting the growth, development and yield of cotton. A field trial was conducted to determine the influence of environmental factors, viz. rainfall periods, temperature, sun shine hours and humidity on the development of disease. Bacterial blight disease was recorded with its appearance and subsequently at weekly interval till it prevailed on G. Cot. Hy.12 (Non Bt). The incidence of bacterial blight disease (BLB) was noticed during 28 to 49th standard week with the maximum disease intensity in third week of September (23.5% PDI). None of the abiotic factors had significant influence on bacterial blight disease progress and development.

Open access
Efficacy of Different Fungicides Against Dry Rot Pathogen of Potato Caused by Fusarium sp. under In vitro Condition

Abstract

Potato crop is affected by numerous diseases in field, as well as in storage conditions, particularly in cold storage. Dry rot of potato is caused by Fusarium sp. Dry rot of seed tubers can reduce crop establishment by killing developing potato sprouts, and crop losses can be up to 25%, while more than 60% of tubers can be infected in storage. It is a rich source of energy, which supplement food source of a country. In this experiment, four systemic and four non-systemic fungicides were tested at different concentrations in vitro for their comparative efficacy against inhibition of the growth of Fusarium sp. through poisoned food technique. To manage these diseases effectively, different concentrations of fungicides were tested. Results revealed against Fusarium sp. that carbendazim and benomyl significantly inhibited the fungal growth even at its lower concentration (100 ppm) and proved statistically superior over the rest of the fungicides tested at different concentrations and among non-systemic fungicides, MEMC significantly inhibited the fungal growth even at its lower concentration (1000 ppm).

Open access