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Boris Lipták and Barbora Vitázková

Abstract

Introduction of non-indigenous exotic species to new areas, where they may establish viable populations and become invasive, is a considerable problem in the protection of nature worldwide, as these species may alter the indigenous species population structure and potentially even decrease the biodiversity. The European fauna underwent through major negative changes on the continent and nowadays, it experiences another new treat, represented by the expanding aquarium pet trade, and with it, associated species (and disease) introductions. Exotic freshwater crustaceans are one of the taxa widely incorporated in the business, counting a remarkable number of species. Recent records of the exotic marbled crayfish or Marmorkrebs (Procambarus fallax f. virginalis) in German in open ecosystems in Slovakia pointed to human-mediated introductions associated with aquarium pet trade in the country. In this regard, a study of the aquarium pet trade both in expositions and shops and online was assessed. Several crustacean taxa are available both in pet trade exhibitions and online through the Internet. Altogether 26 different species were identified in the aquarium trade in Slovakia. These are Procambarus fallax f. virginalis, P. clarkii, P. alleni, Cherax quadricarinatus, C. destructor, C. holthuisi, C. peknyi, Cambarellus patzcuarensis and C. diminutus occurring in the aquarium pet trade in Slovakia (n = 9). Procambarus fallax f. virginalis, P. clarkii and C. patzuarensis are the most common in this regard. There is also a quantity of other related taxa in the aquarium pet trade in Slovakia, mainly Caridina spp. (n = 5), Neocaridina spp. (n = 4), Atyopsis moluccensis, Atya gabonensis, Arachnochium kulsiense and several taxa of exotic crabs (n = 5) belonging to three different genera (Cardiosoma, Geosesarma and Gecarinus) present. Neocaridina davidi is identified as the most frequent in this regard. As some of the species can become established and form viable populations in natural ecosystems in Europe, we alert the public to handle the animals responsibly and thus maintain and protect indigenous European fauna.

Open access

B. Kaprinay, Z. Gáspárová, B. Lipták, K. Frimmel and R. Sotníková

Abstract

The aim of the work was to find an experimental model suitable for the study of endothelial dysfunction induced by MS. We used hypertriglyceridemic rats (HTG) that were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet of different composition and duration: a 6-week administration of standard diet with an addition of cholesterol and fat (HTGChol) and a three-month administration of the same diet with an addition of fructose (HTGCholF). We investigated the effect of different diets on aortic endothelial function. The standard diet fed Wistar (W) and HTG rats served as controls. Decision for addition of fructose to HTGChol was done based on in vitro experiments evaluating the effect of high concentration of saccharide in the incubation solution on aortic endothelial function. This intervention caused significant deterioration of relaxation induced by acetylcholine (ACh). While in HTGChol, we did not find significant differences in the function of the aorta compared to W or HTG rats, adding of fructose to high fat diet and prolonging its administration resulted in significantly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxation. It seems that such a model is suitable for the study of endothelial dysfunction in MS and the effect of substances that may protect the endothelium.

Open access

D. Micháliková, B. Tyukos Kaprinay, B. Lipták, K. Švík, L. Slovák, R. Sotníková, Š. Bezek and Z. Gáspárová

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine pharmacological possibilities of influencing the risk factors of metabolic syndrome (MetS). Hypertriacylglycerolemic (HTG) rats fed with high-fat-fructose diet (HFFD) were used as a model of the MetS. Wistar rats fed with standard diet were used as negative control group. HTG rats fed with HFFD for 8 weeks were used as positive control group. The effects of atorvastatin and SMe1EC2 were tested. The compounds were administered to the HTG rats after 5 weeks of HFFD, once a day for 3 weeks. After 8 weeks, the blood serum lipid profile and electrophysiology of neurotransmission in hippocampal sections were evaluated in vitro. SMe1EC2 and atorvastatin had a significant effect on total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) and atorvastatin had a significant effect on triacylglycerols (TGs). SMe1EC2 improved the long-term potentiation (LTP) course in the hippocampus.