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Sibel Ersan, Senem Ertilav, Ali Celik, Aykut Sifil, Caner Cavdar, Mehtat Unlu, Sulen Sarioglu, Huseyin Gulay and Taner Camsari

Abstract

Introduction. Proteinuria after renal transplantation increases the risk of graft failure and mortality. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence and causes of proteinuria in kidney transplant recipients. Methods. All kidney transplant recipients followed up in our clinic were included in the study. As a center protocol 24-hour urine collections were used to quantify protein excretion with 3-month intervals posttransplantation during the first year, and yearly thereafter. The etiology of chronic kidney disease and demographic characteristics of the study group were obtained from outpatient records. Data regarding the immunosuppressive regimens used, 24-hour proteinuria levels and creatinine clearences, new-onset hypertension, new-onset diabetes mellitus, rejection episodes, infections like cytomegalovirus (CMV) and polyoma (BK), and biopsy findings were noted. Results. A total of 260 kidney transplant recipients (97 females, mean age 42.3±12.3 years) were evaluated. Median follow-up period was 36 months; 137 of all transplantations were from living donors. Mean age of donors was 42.7±15 years and 133 were female. Proteinuria with protein excretion ≥300 mg/d was present in 35.4% of patients. The most common cause of biopsy-proven proteinuria was transplant-specific conditions (acute rejection, and borderline changes). Conclusion. The prevalence of proteinuria was 35.4%. The transplant-specific diagnoses were the most likely causes. Even in nonnephrotic ranges it was associated with decreased graft survival.

Open access

Sibel Ersan, Omur Gokmen Sevindik, Caner Cavdar, Sibel Ada, Aykut Sifil, Ali Celik, Sulen Sarioglu and Taner Camsari

Abstract

Introduction. None of the classification systems in immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy has been widely agreed or implemented by clinicians or pathologists. In order to meet this need, "Oxford Classification System", which is highly reproducible and predictive for clinical course, was developed in 2009. In the present study, we investigated clinical and pathological characteristics of patients with IgA nephropathy based on current classification and the predictivity of crescent presence on prognosis. Methods. The study comprised 40 patients with diagnosis of primary IgA nephropathy on renal biopsy. The biopsy findings and follow-up parameters of patients were retrospectively re-evaluated. Pathological findings were examined based on the Oxford classification system. The presence of crescent formation in the specimens was noted. Results. The presence of crescent formation was predictive of poor prognosis regarding the glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), the level of proteinuria, and mean arterial pressure (MAP). Conclusion: Considering the importance of crescent formation in prediction of the clinical course and need for immunosuppressive therapy, it is suggested that crescent presence can be included in this classification system.