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Paulina Pyka, Aleksandra Gawęda, Krzysztof Szopa, Axel Müller and Magdalena Sikorska

Abstract

In the Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) metamorphic complex, kyanite-quartz segregations with biotite-rich selvage occur in mylonitized mica schists. In this paper, the problem of fluid flow and aluminium mobility during the uplift of the crystalline massif, and the position of the segregations in the history of Western Tatra metamorphic complex, is adressed. The reaction Alm + Rt ➔ Ilm + Ky + Qtz is considered to be the result of a pressure drop from above to below 9 kbar. Ti-in-biotite geothermometry shows the temperature range to be 579-639°C that is related to heating and decompression associated with granite intrusion. Major-element mass-balance calculations show that Al remained stable in the selvage + segregation system whereas other elements (e.g. Cr, HFSE) were mobilized. The kyanite-quartz segregations formed from local fluids generated during dehydration of the metapelitic rocks during uplift. The main mechanism was likely diffusion-driven mass-transfer into extension-related cracks.

Open access

Aleksandra Gawęda, Krzysztof Szopa, David Chew, Urs Klötzli, Axel Müller, Magdalena Sikorska and Paulina Pyka

Abstract

On the southeastern slope of the Baranec Mount in the Western Tatra Mountains (Slovakia) an apatite-rich pegmatite-like segregation was found in the subvertical fault zone cutting metapelitic rocks. Two zones: felsic (F) and mafic (M) were found, differing in mineral assemblages and consequently in chemistry. Fluorapatite crystals yield a LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age of 328.6 ± 2.4 Ma. A temperature decrease from 634 °C to 454 °C at a pressure around 500 to 400 MPa with oxygen fugacity increasing during crystallization are the possible conditions for formation of the pegmatite-like segregation, while secondary alterations took place in the temperature range of 340 – 320 °C. The Sr-Nd isotope composition of both apatite and whole rock point toward a crustal origin of the dike in question, suggesting partial melting of (P, F, H2O)-rich metasedimentary rocks during prolonged decompression of the Tatra Massif. The original partial melt (felsic component) was mixed with an external (F, H2O)-rich fluid, carrying Fe and Mg fluxed from more mafic metapelites and crystallizing as biotite and epidote in the mafic component of the dyke.