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Open access

Andrzej Gruchot, Artur Szwalec and Paweł Mundała

Abstract

Nine million tonnes a year of ash-slag wastes generated in Poland by power plants is a serious problem. On the other hand, it is a serious resource that may be used in earthworks, particularly in road engineering. Several mechanical and chemical properties of the mixture were estimated. The results are as follows: the properties classify it as useless for earthworks purposes. Norm requirements [PN-S-02205:1998] concerning usage of furnace waste were not fulfilled with reference to linear swelling value. What is more, frost heaving criteria categorised it as questionable soils, which in combination with high values of linear swelling can cause a decline in the stability structure, which was formed from a tested mixture with lack of proper isolation from water. Concerning fulfilling requirements of the norm, shear strength and load capacity, an attempt to reduce swelling should be made, for example through improving graining of ashslag mixture by adding some sand. However there are no doubts in matters pertaining to macro and trace elements’ content in the potential leachate from the structure, which was formed from the tested mixture.

Open access

Artur Szwalec, Paweł Mundała and Renata Kędzior

Abstract

Electricity and heat have been produced in Poland by the combustion of coal. Ash-slag, a by-product of this process, has been mainly deposited in landfills. Until the end of 2011, about 258 million tonnes of ash-slag have been deposited in landfills. Herbaceous plant and soil samples were taken from four directions (east, west, south and north) in three locations on the landfill embankment: base, middle and top. The negative influence of furnace waste landfill on herbaceous plants was confirmed by the phytoaccumulation indexes (WF) of the examined elements: WF Cd - medium to intensive; WF Pb - low to medium; WF Zn - low to intensive and WF Cu - low to medium.