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Anne Wareing

Abstract

There is little evidence on which to define the best treatment for the prevention of bleeding in people with congenital bleeding disorders undergoing surgery. As a result, treatment regimens are frequently based on local protocols developed by expert clinicians and information from uncontrolled observational studies. This article summarises the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group systematic review on ‘Treatment for preventing bleeding in people with haemophilia or other congenital bleeding disorders (CBDs) undergoing surgery’.

Open access

Anne Wareing

Abstract

Rates of obesity are rising in the general population. People with haemophilia are at high risk for being overweight or obese, and may benefit from physical activity-based interventions. The school setting is an ideal environment to implement physical activity-based interventions as it greatly influences the first two decades of life. However, there is a lack of knowledge about the benefits of exercise for managing haemophilia, as well as possible restriction of physical activity by parents or carers due to a fear of increasing the number of bleeding episodes. Furthermore, schools and teachers may be uncertain of how to integrate physical activity for children with bleeding disorders. This article summarises the Cochrane Metabolic and Endocrine Disorders Group systematic review on ‘school-based physical activity programs for promoting physical activity and fitness in children and adolescents aged 6 to 18 and considers published literature about the role of physical activity within haemophilia.’

Open access

Sandra Dodgson, Jenny Bryan, Simon Fletcher, Cathy Harrison, Clare Ibbs, April Jones, Paul McLaughlin, Gráinne O’Brien, Sharon Varney, Anne Wareing and Pamela Wick

Abstract

Members of the multi-disciplinary team involved in delivering haemophilia care face a range of significant clinical and service leadership challenges. These include the developing treatment landscape, the drive towards individualised care, an uneven age structure among haemophilia nurses and constrained budgets. Faced with such challenges, the ASPIRE programme has been established to encourage and support a new generation of haemophilia leaders who are committed to improving haemophilia care across the UK, and beyond. The programme is open to healthcare professional from multiple disciplines, and is designed to support the development of a leadership community comprising members of the haemophilia care team in a way that contrasts with hierarchical leadership and management courses more typically found in the NHS.