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Anja Dieckmann and Matthias Unfried

Abstract

Emotions affect all of our daily decisions and, of course, they also influence our evaluations of brands, products and advertisements. But what exactly do consumers feel when they watch a TV commercial, visit a website or when they interact with a brand in different ways? Measuring such emotions is not an easy task. In the past, the effectiveness of marketing material was evaluated mostly by subsequent surveys. Now, with the emergence of neuroscientific approaches like EEG, the measurement of real-time reactions is possible, for instance, when watching a commercial. However, most neuroscientific procedures are fairly invasive and irritating. For an EEG, for instance, numerous electrodes need to be placed on the participant's scalp. Furthermore, data analysis is highly complex. Scientific expertise is necessary for interpretation, so the procedure remains a black box to most practitioners and the results are still rather controversial. By contrast, automatic facial analysis provides similar information without having to wire study participants. In addition, the results of such analyses are intuitive and easy to interpret even for laypeople. These convincing advantages led GfK Company to decide on facial analysis and to develop a tool suitable for measuring emotional responses to marketing stimuli, making it easily applicable in marketing research practice.

Open access

Fabian Buder, Anja Dieckmann, Holger Dietrich and Julia Wieting

Open access

Ronald Frank, Matthias Unfried, Regina Schreder and Anja Dieckmann

Abstract

When it comes to purchase decisions for fair-trade clothing, there seems to be a gap between actions and words. Only few people buy fair trade despite stating moral concerns. Based on a survey of German consumers and the results of a behavioral economic game, the article presents strategies to minimize the gap identified between the willingness to purchase and the moral standards that many consumers set for themselves. The data suggests several consumer types and provides a few promising starting points for strategies that are not based on selflessness but rather generate more tangible benefits for the individual consumer groups. At least three of five consumer types or two-thirds of the consumers may constitute possible target groups according to the findings.