Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 2 of 2 items for

  • Author: Andrzej Miśkiewicz x
Clear All Modify Search
Open access

Andrzej Miśkiewicz, Tomira Rogala, Teresa Rościszewska, Tomasz Rudzki and Tadeusz Fidecki

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to compare auditory judgments of sound clarity of music examples recorded in a concert hall with predictions of clarity made from the impulse response signal recorded in the same hall. Auditory judgments were made with the use of two methods: by rating sound clarity on a numerical scale with two endpoints, and by absolute magnitude estimation. Results obtained by both methods were then compared against the values of clarity indices, C 80 and C 50, determined from the impulse response of the concert hall, measured in places in which the microphone was located during recording of music examples. Results show that auditory judgments of sound clarity and predictions made from the C 80 index yield a similar rank order of data, but the relation between the C 80 scale and perceived sound clarity is nonlinear. The data also show that the values of C 80 and C 50 indices are in very close agreement.

Open access

Tomira Rogala, Andrzej Miskiewicz and Piotr Rogowski

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to explore the effect of the pitch strength of pure tones constituting a dyad on the accuracy of musical interval identification. Pitch strength was controlled by presenting the intervals in different frequency regions and varying their duration. The intervals were organized into 18 blocks made up by a combination of three octaves: the second (65.4-130.8 Hz), the fourth (261.6- 523.3 Hz), and the sixth octave (1047-2093 Hz), and six tone durations, ranging 50-2000 ms in the second octave, and 10-500 ms in the two higher ones. The results indicate that interval identification improves with increasing pitch strength of the interval’s component tones. The identification scores were much lower in the second octave than in the two higher ones and in all octaves identification worsened as the interval’s duration was shortened. The intervals were most often confused with intervals of similar size rather than with their inversions and intervals of similar sonic character. This finding suggests that the main cue for the identification of harmonic intervals is the pitch distance between two tones. However, in the low pitch range, when the tone pitches are less salient, the impression of consonance may become a helpful, although not very effective cue.