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  • Author: Andrzej Grosicki x
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Influence of Magnesium on the Deposition of Cadmium in Rats

Abstract

Magnesium chloride was given via drinking water (500 mg Mg/L) to rats exposed intragastrically to cadmium (cadmium 109) at a dose corresponding to 10 mg/kg diet for 7, 14, 21, and 28 d. The results provided the evidence that magnesium decreased cadmium retention in the duodenum, kidneys, and liver after 7 d. Significant reduction in cadmium retention was also found on days 14 d and 21 in kidneys. No significant decreases in cadmium retention in the organs examined were noted after 28 d. The results suggest that beneficial action of magnesium on body cadmium accumulation ceased with time after the two metal administration.

Open access
Magnesium supplements affect selected cadmium toxic actions and uptake of repeated doses of cadmium

Abstract

The importance of magnesium supplements on organ retention of cadmium and allometric parameters after repeated exposure to cadmium chloride were studied in male Wistar rats. Magnesium chloride was given via drinking water (500 mg Mg/L) to rats exposed intragastrically to cadmium chloride (labelled with cadmium 109) at a daily dose corresponding to 25 mg/kg diet for 7, 14, 21, and 28 d. Supplements of magnesium temporarily decreased cadmium retention in the duodenum and liver. No significant differences in cadmium retention were evidenced in the kidneys and testicles. The supplements of magnesium also retain more of the body weight gains and restore the relative liver and testicle weight in rats intoxicated with cadmium. Comparison of the present results with earlier reports suggests a relationship between doses of magnesium and cadmium; higher doses of cadmium need more magnesium to overcome toxic action of the heavy metal.

Open access
Correlation Between the Concentration of Lead in the Blood of Dogs and People Living in the Same Environmental Conditions

Abstract

The studies, conducted between 2010 and 2012, involved 102 dogs and 505 people from Lower Silesia (LS), 104 dogs and 578 people from the Legnica - Głogów Copper Mining Region (LGCMR), and 101 dogs and 897 people from the Upper Silesian Industrial Region (USIR). A significant positive correlation between blood lead concentration (BLC) in dogs and people living in the same environment was found. Moreover, the data revealed an increase in BLC in dogs and people with the progressive aging of the body. The highest average BLC in dogs and humans were reported in the LGCMR followed by USIR and LS.

Open access
Lead in the Blood of Dogs Living in Variously Contaminated Environment

Abstract

The aim of the study was to evaluate the concentration of lead in blood of dogs from Polish urban polluted areas including the Lower Silesia Region (LSR; 102 dogs), KGHM Polish Copper Region (PCR; 102 dogs), and Upper Silesia Industrial Region (USIR; 102 dogs). Moreover, it was investigated whether age, height, gender, and weight influence blood lead concentrations in the dogs. The mean concentrations of lead in dogs from LSR, PCR, and USIR were 16.18 μg/L, 31.82 μg /L, and 32.53 μg /L, respectively. In the same age groups of dogs, the concentrations of lead were the smallest and significantly lower in LSR than those reported in PCR and USIR. Mean blood concentrations of lead demonstrated a decreasing tendency in regard to the height of the examined dogs - 30.00 μg /L (low dogs), 27.37 μg /L (medium dogs), and 25.12 μg /L (high dogs).These findings indicate that blood lead concentrations mainly depend on lead contamination of the dogs’ habitat. In all regions examined, lead concentrations significantly increased with the length of the dogs’ life. Height, weight, and gender had no significant effect on lead content.

Open access