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Anca Dinicu

Abstract

Migration is not a new phenomenon. People have been forced or tempted to leave their homes since ancient times, due to the economic (lack of resources, type of property, level of national economy development, better careers, famine), social (family reunification, social justice, poverty), political (oppression, war, ideology) or environmental (flooding, drought) problems. If for some, migrating is a quest of improving an already good living, for many others, it is a quest of survival. On this second aspect the paper intends to focus on, especially by relating the issue with the pressure created not only upon some European countries, but also upon the European Union as a political international actor.

It seems that migration reveals a whole spectrum of vulnerabilities concerning the European Union internal security, including lack of sane regulation, which if not tackled properly can easily create disorder and endanger regional security. One thing is for sure – tackling migration and asylum problems should be structured on solidarity and responsibility, both at national and European levels.

Open access

Anca Dinicu

Abstract

The State, as the fundamental unit of the international system, appeals to ultimate power and authority in order to control its own domestic affairs and claims equality as a legal basis regarding its relation with other legal political units. But the existence of the sovereign state in the current international context, where the multiple interdependencies generate divergence and cooperation in the same, is subject to permanent challenges. And the issue is not easy approachable in theory, nor in practice. Like other concepts, as security or democracy, the concept of sovereignty needs to be updated according to the new rules revealed by the process of globalization, rules that are defined not by the equal states, but by the powerful ones.

Open access

Anca Dinicu

Abstract

The international security environment is deeply affected by the complex process of globalization, as well as by the nation-state’s permanent search for redefinition of its role as a sovereign political entity. A subject of international law, able to assume international rights and obligations, particularly because of its sovereignty, the state is also an actor whose existence, this time in the field of international relations, is fundamentally conditioned by a series of elements by which precisely the great variety of this form of political and social organization is expressed. External power and internal political organization, social structure and level of economic development, as well as other characteristics, make analysis of the interaction between nation-state and globalization generate highly diverse results with particular consequences on the ability to influence each other. This article therefore aims to put on debate how, at the end of the second decade of the 21st century, the democratic and developed nation-state manages to structure its national security and to found its national interest in the very challenging environment generated by the globalization process

Open access

Anca Dinicu

Abstract

The international scene is still modeled on the states’ interests, despite the challenges of non-state actors, whose international policy intervention can not be described as new. The state still continues to play a central role in shaping the international system, even if it is forced to act in an environment where large corporations are designing many of the national economies of states whose nationality they do not have, and non-governmental organizations are at the outskirts of an emerging global civil society, which could jeopardize the state’s right and obligation to prevent injustice, and considering that at the global level there is no entity able to issue regulations in this regard, all of which amid testing international governance models. Looking retrospectively, during the Cold War, the state was much stronger and the threats which it had to face were characterized by a much higher degree of predictability. This paper aims to analyze the contemporary international system by reference to that specific to the Cold War, based on factors considered relevant, the objective being to identify the possibility of turning the present international system to a new Cold War.

Open access

Anca Dinicu and Daniel-Sorin Constantin

Abstract

The almost global democratization removed, among other things, the constraints on cooperation between the countries from all over the world. The collapse of ideological barriers has facilitated not only redesigning the states’ foreign policies on other foundations, but also a non-governmental expansion through the many possibilities offered by the free movement of persons, material and spiritual goods, capital and services. All these, enhanced by the boom of social communication networks, have influenced national companies, giving them a touch of transnationality translated by heterogeneity in relation to which national governments seem unable to resist. The permeability of borders, one of the features of globalization, also applies in this case of influence and cultural communion, of movement of people and ideas. This paper aims to address the issue of multiculturalism generated by the migration phenomenon not as a factor of social cohesion, but as one able to induce disorder and adversity against those who are different. The analytical approach is based on the empirical study of the current European context, which is under deep pressure as a result of the immigration „Tsunami” generated largely by the complex situation in the Middle East and North Africa. Therefore, the two possible initialization research questions might be:

  • are we confronting a single and big problem hanging over the entire geopolitical region mentioned above or is it necessary to focus on each national space separately and try to settle issues from a local-regional perspective by the international community together with the internal forces directly involved in conflict?

  • is there today a unified European view on multiculturalism applicable at national level? This is, in fact, the issue over which the analysis focuses.

Open access

Ghiţă Bârsan, Anca Dinicu, Vasile Năstăsescu and Romana Oancea

Abstract

Estimating the degree of vulnerability of a region implies both the identification of the dependencies as well as of the interdependencies. The dependencies refer to a set of physical, social, economic, environmental and political-military conditions and processes and the interdependencies have in view physical, cyber, geographical and logical aspects that may indirectly affect the daily rhythm of the population, the economy or even the national security. The present paper aims at estimating the degree of vulnerability by constructing a model that would determine the index of vulnerability associated to a given area, an index that is directly dependent on demographic, economic, governmental factors, on the interdependence with other sectors and also on the history of the events that occurred in the area in the recent years.