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  • Author: Anamaria Ekert Kabalin x
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Influence of Meat Type, Sex and Storage Time on Fatty Acid Profile of Free Range Dalmatian Turkey

Abstract

Dalmatian turkey is a slow growing breed kept in free range systems. It is a type of “old fashioned poultry” whose meat is present on the market and accepted by consumers. However, no information about its meat quality and fatty acid profile is available. The chemical composition of the meat was influenced by gender and meat type and these differences could be important from the consumer’s point of view. Fatty acid composition was characterized by the predominance of n6 fatty acids, especially C18:2n6 and a high n6/n3 ratio. Increased time of storage strongly reduced the long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LC PUFA) and increased atherogenicity and thrombogenicity indices (AI and TI) in thigh tissue. The content of beneficial n3 PUFA was influenced by meat type, with lower values of C18:3n3 and higher values of LC PUFA in the breast compared to the thighs. The potential intake of LC PUFA of comercial turkey in the human diet was lower in comparison to poultry fed with complete feed mixtures. An interesting fact was the higher DHA values in comparison with DPA values in breast tissue, which is characteristic of old poultry breeds. The Dalmatian turkey is a highly valued traditional product and an important archaic breed for gene preservation and biodiversity. Nevertheless, Dalmatian turkey meat could be even further improved by minimal dietary manipulation to become a product with additional health promoting effects.

Open access
Postural Behaviour in Gilts Housed on Concrete and Rubber Slats During four Seasons

Abstract

In the present study, postural behaviour was compared between gilts kept in service unit with different types of flooring during all seasons. The study included four 28-day production cycles and 10 gilts per cycle, equally divided into a control and an experimental group. Control gilts were housed in gestation stalls with slatted concrete floor, whereas in the experimental group the floor was covered with an adjusted rubber mat. Postural behaviour of gilts was observed 4 times per cycle for 4 hours. Study results showed that during cooler seasons, gilts in concrete stalls spent more time standing and lying sternally, whereas gilts in matted stalls were mostly lying, predominantly laterally (P<0.001 all). There were no significant between group differences according to the time the gilts spent sitting or the frequency of changing posture in any season observed. Nevertheless, experimental animals spent significantly less time changing standing to both lying positions during all seasons (P<0.01 all). In conclusion, rubber mats may improve lying comfort in gilts; however, when using rubber mats, the house thermal conditions should be taken in consideration.

Open access
Relation Between Microclimate and Air Quality in the Extensively Reared Turkey House

Abstract

Good air quality in poultry houses is crucial for animal health and productivity. In these houses, air is generally contaminated with noxious gases and microorganisms, the concentrations of which depend on numerous factors including microclimate. In this case study, the relation between microclimate and air concentrations of noxious gases and microorganisms was investigated in extensively reared turkey house. The study was carried out at a family household in Dalmatia hinterland, Croatia, with 50.3±3.1 turkeys kept in the house during the study period. Air temperature, relative humidity, airflow rate, concentrations of ammonia, carbon dioxide, bacteria and fungi in indoor air were measured three times per month from September to December, in the morning, prior to releasing turkeys out for grazing. Air temperature ranged from 9.73 to 26.98 °C, relative humidity from 63.29% to 75.08%, and airflow rate from 0.11 to 0.17 m/s. Lowest ammonia and carbon dioxide concentrations were measured in September (2.17 ppm and 550 ppm, respectively) and highest in December (4.50 ppm and 900 ppm, respectively). Bacterial and fungal counts were lowest in December (2.51×105 CFU/m3 and 3.27×103 CFU/m3 air, respectively) and highest in September (6.85×105 CFU/m3 and 1.06x105 CFU/m3 air, respectively). Air temperature and relative humidity showed negative correlation with concentrations of noxious gases and positive correlation with air microorganisms (P<0.05 all).

Open access
PRLR-AluI Gene Polymorphism And Litter Size Traits In Highly Prolific Line Of Topigs 20 Sows

Abstract

The objective of the present study was to identify the Prolactin Receptor (PRLR) gene polymorphism related to litter size traits. The study included 101 Topigs 20 line of sows with 426 litters. The traits studied were: Total Number of Born (TNB), Number of Born Alive (NBA), Number of Still Born (NSB), and Number of MUMmified (NMUM) piglets. Polymorphism was identified with the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Allelic and genotype frequencies and deviation from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were verified with the chi-square test. Analysis of litter size traits was performed using the General Linear Model, which included the potential environmental effects. Additive and dominant allele variances were observed by the regression procedure. In the studied population of sows, the frequency of heterozygotes (0.5149) for PRLR gene exceeded the total number of AA (0.0198) and BB (0.4653) homozygotes, which resulted in a high proportion of B allele (0.7228). The results for PRLR showed statistically significant (P<0.05) differences in first parity sows between BB and AB genotypes for TNB and NBA. Significant differences (P<0.05) were recorded in third parity sows between BB and AB genotypes for NBA, and in AA genotype versus AB and BB genotypes for NMUM. The fourth and subsequent parity sows of AA genotype had a significantly higher (P<0.05) rate of NBA as compared with those of AB and BB genotypes. In all parities analysed, the difference between the BB and AB genotypes for NBA was statistically significant (P<0.05). Interpretation of the results at the levels of phenotypes and either additive or dominant variance was quite difficult due to the small number of AA homozygous sows. The calculation model yielded a significant effect (P<0.05) as well as tendency (P<0.1) for the mentioned effects except for age at first farrowing.

Open access